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Iron deficiency is uncommon among lactating women in urban Nepal, despite a high risk of inadequate dietary iron intake.
Br J Nutr 2014; 112(1):132-41BJ

Abstract

The main objective of the present study was to examine the association between dietary Fe intake and dietary predictors of Fe status and Hb concentration among lactating women in Bhaktapur, Nepal. We included 500 randomly selected lactating women in a cross-sectional survey. Dietary information was obtained through three interactive 24 h recall interviews including personal recipes. Concentrations of Hb and plasma ferritin and soluble transferrin receptors were measured. The daily median Fe intake from food was 17·5 mg, and 70% of the women were found to be at the risk of inadequate dietary Fe intake. Approximately 90% of the women had taken Fe supplements in pregnancy. The prevalence of anaemia was 20% (Hb levels < 123 g/l) and that of Fe deficiency was 5% (plasma ferritin levels < 15 μg/l). In multiple regression analyses, there was a weak positive association between dietary Fe intake and body Fe (β 0·03, 95% CI 0·014, 0·045). Among the women with children aged < 6 months, but not those with older infants, intake of Fe supplements in pregnancy for at least 6 months was positively associated with body Fe (P for interaction < 0·01). Due to a relatively high dietary intake of non-haem Fe combined with low bioavailability, a high proportion of the women in the present study were at the risk of inadequate intake of Fe. The low prevalence of anaemia and Fe deficiency may be explained by the majority of the women consuming Fe supplements in pregnancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences,PO Box 4, St Olavs Plass,N-0130Oslo,Norway.Centre for International Health, University of Bergen,PO Box 7800,5020Bergen,Norway.Centre for International Health, University of Bergen,PO Box 7800,5020Bergen,Norway.Department of Child Health,Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University,Kathmandu,Nepal.Department of Nutrition,Harvard School of Public Health,665 Huntington Avenue,Boston,MA02115,USA.Centre for International Health, University of Bergen,PO Box 7800,5020Bergen,Norway.Department of Child Health,Institute of Medicine, Tribhuvan University,Kathmandu,Nepal.Department of Nutrition,Harvard School of Public Health,665 Huntington Avenue,Boston,MA02115,USA.Department of Clinical Science,University of Bergen,5020Bergen,Norway.Department of Nutrition,Harvard School of Public Health,665 Huntington Avenue,Boston,MA02115,USA.Centre for International Health, University of Bergen,PO Box 7800,5020Bergen,Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24708993

Citation

Henjum, Sigrun, et al. "Iron Deficiency Is Uncommon Among Lactating Women in Urban Nepal, Despite a High Risk of Inadequate Dietary Iron Intake." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 112, no. 1, 2014, pp. 132-41.
Henjum S, Manger M, Skeie E, et al. Iron deficiency is uncommon among lactating women in urban Nepal, despite a high risk of inadequate dietary iron intake. Br J Nutr. 2014;112(1):132-41.
Henjum, S., Manger, M., Skeie, E., Ulak, M., Thorne-Lyman, A. L., Chandyo, R., ... Strand, T. A. (2014). Iron deficiency is uncommon among lactating women in urban Nepal, despite a high risk of inadequate dietary iron intake. The British Journal of Nutrition, 112(1), pp. 132-41. doi:10.1017/S0007114514000592.
Henjum S, et al. Iron Deficiency Is Uncommon Among Lactating Women in Urban Nepal, Despite a High Risk of Inadequate Dietary Iron Intake. Br J Nutr. 2014 Jul 14;112(1):132-41. PubMed PMID: 24708993.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron deficiency is uncommon among lactating women in urban Nepal, despite a high risk of inadequate dietary iron intake. AU - Henjum,Sigrun, AU - Manger,Mari, AU - Skeie,Eli, AU - Ulak,Manjeswori, AU - Thorne-Lyman,Andrew L, AU - Chandyo,Ram, AU - Shrestha,Prakash S, AU - Locks,Lindsey, AU - Ulvik,Rune J, AU - Fawzi,Wafaie W, AU - Strand,Tor A, Y1 - 2014/04/08/ PY - 2014/4/9/entrez PY - 2014/4/9/pubmed PY - 2014/9/3/medline SP - 132 EP - 41 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 112 IS - 1 N2 - The main objective of the present study was to examine the association between dietary Fe intake and dietary predictors of Fe status and Hb concentration among lactating women in Bhaktapur, Nepal. We included 500 randomly selected lactating women in a cross-sectional survey. Dietary information was obtained through three interactive 24 h recall interviews including personal recipes. Concentrations of Hb and plasma ferritin and soluble transferrin receptors were measured. The daily median Fe intake from food was 17·5 mg, and 70% of the women were found to be at the risk of inadequate dietary Fe intake. Approximately 90% of the women had taken Fe supplements in pregnancy. The prevalence of anaemia was 20% (Hb levels < 123 g/l) and that of Fe deficiency was 5% (plasma ferritin levels < 15 μg/l). In multiple regression analyses, there was a weak positive association between dietary Fe intake and body Fe (β 0·03, 95% CI 0·014, 0·045). Among the women with children aged < 6 months, but not those with older infants, intake of Fe supplements in pregnancy for at least 6 months was positively associated with body Fe (P for interaction < 0·01). Due to a relatively high dietary intake of non-haem Fe combined with low bioavailability, a high proportion of the women in the present study were at the risk of inadequate intake of Fe. The low prevalence of anaemia and Fe deficiency may be explained by the majority of the women consuming Fe supplements in pregnancy. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24708993/Iron_deficiency_is_uncommon_among_lactating_women_in_urban_Nepal_despite_a_high_risk_of_inadequate_dietary_iron_intake_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114514000592/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -