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Fat-soluble vitamin deficiency in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis.
J Clin Pathol. 2014 Jul; 67(7):605-8.JC

Abstract

AIMS

Determine the prevalence of fat-soluble vitamin deficiency in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) aged ≤18 years in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, from 2007 to 2010.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis of fat-soluble vitamin levels in children aged ≤18 years who lived in NSW and attended any of the three paediatric CF centres from 2007 to 2010. An audit of demographic and clinical data during the first vitamin level measurement of the study period was performed.

RESULTS

Deficiency of one or more fat-soluble vitamins was present in 240/530 children (45%) on their first vitamin level test in the study period. The prevalence of vitamins D and E deficiency fell from 22.11% in 2007 to 15.54% in 2010, and 20.22% to 13.89%, respectively. The prevalence of vitamin A deficiency increased from 11.17% to 13.13%. Low vitamin K was present in 29% in 2007, and prevalence of prolonged prothrombin time increased from 19.21% to 22.62%. Fat-soluble vitamin deficiency is present in 10%-35% of children with pancreatic insufficiency, but only a very small proportion of children who are pancreatic-sufficient.

CONCLUSIONS

This is one of few studies of fat-soluble vitamin deficiency in children with CF in Australia. Fat-soluble vitamin testing is essential to identify deficiency in pancreatic-insufficient children who may be non-compliant to supplementation or require a higher supplement dose, and pancreatic-sufficient children who may be progressing to insufficiency. Testing of vitamin K-dependent factors needs consideration. Further studies are needed to monitor rates of vitamin deficiency in the CF community.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Southern IML Pathology, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, John Hunter Children's Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Sydney Children's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Department of Gastroenterology, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Department of Paediatric Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, John Hunter Children's Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sydney Children's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia School of Women's and Children's Health, UNSW Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Department of Clinical Biochemistry, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Southern IML Pathology, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24711511

Citation

Rana, Malay, et al. "Fat-soluble Vitamin Deficiency in Children and Adolescents With Cystic Fibrosis." Journal of Clinical Pathology, vol. 67, no. 7, 2014, pp. 605-8.
Rana M, Wong-See D, Katz T, et al. Fat-soluble vitamin deficiency in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis. J Clin Pathol. 2014;67(7):605-8.
Rana, M., Wong-See, D., Katz, T., Gaskin, K., Whitehead, B., Jaffe, A., Coakley, J., & Lochhead, A. (2014). Fat-soluble vitamin deficiency in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis. Journal of Clinical Pathology, 67(7), 605-8. https://doi.org/10.1136/jclinpath-2013-201787
Rana M, et al. Fat-soluble Vitamin Deficiency in Children and Adolescents With Cystic Fibrosis. J Clin Pathol. 2014;67(7):605-8. PubMed PMID: 24711511.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fat-soluble vitamin deficiency in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis. AU - Rana,Malay, AU - Wong-See,Denise, AU - Katz,Tamarah, AU - Gaskin,Kevin, AU - Whitehead,Bruce, AU - Jaffe,Adam, AU - Coakley,John, AU - Lochhead,Alistair, Y1 - 2014/04/07/ PY - 2014/4/9/entrez PY - 2014/4/9/pubmed PY - 2014/8/16/medline KW - AIRWAYS DISEASE KW - BIOCHEMISTRY KW - CHEMICAL PATHOLOGY KW - PAEDIATRIC CHEMISTRY KW - VITAMIN D SP - 605 EP - 8 JF - Journal of clinical pathology JO - J Clin Pathol VL - 67 IS - 7 N2 - AIMS: Determine the prevalence of fat-soluble vitamin deficiency in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) aged ≤18 years in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, from 2007 to 2010. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of fat-soluble vitamin levels in children aged ≤18 years who lived in NSW and attended any of the three paediatric CF centres from 2007 to 2010. An audit of demographic and clinical data during the first vitamin level measurement of the study period was performed. RESULTS: Deficiency of one or more fat-soluble vitamins was present in 240/530 children (45%) on their first vitamin level test in the study period. The prevalence of vitamins D and E deficiency fell from 22.11% in 2007 to 15.54% in 2010, and 20.22% to 13.89%, respectively. The prevalence of vitamin A deficiency increased from 11.17% to 13.13%. Low vitamin K was present in 29% in 2007, and prevalence of prolonged prothrombin time increased from 19.21% to 22.62%. Fat-soluble vitamin deficiency is present in 10%-35% of children with pancreatic insufficiency, but only a very small proportion of children who are pancreatic-sufficient. CONCLUSIONS: This is one of few studies of fat-soluble vitamin deficiency in children with CF in Australia. Fat-soluble vitamin testing is essential to identify deficiency in pancreatic-insufficient children who may be non-compliant to supplementation or require a higher supplement dose, and pancreatic-sufficient children who may be progressing to insufficiency. Testing of vitamin K-dependent factors needs consideration. Further studies are needed to monitor rates of vitamin deficiency in the CF community. SN - 1472-4146 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24711511/Fat_soluble_vitamin_deficiency_in_children_and_adolescents_with_cystic_fibrosis_ L2 - https://jcp.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=24711511 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -