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ZnO nanoparticles and root colonization by a beneficial pseudomonad influence essential metal responses in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).
Nanotoxicology. 2015 May; 9(3):271-8.N

Abstract

Nanoparticles (NPs) incorporated into commercial products are reactive on plants. Here, the influence of a root-associated bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 (PcO6) on the responses of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) to commercial ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) was examined. ZnO NPs (250-1000 mg Zn/kg) significantly (p = 0.05) impacted root elongation after 7 days; only at 1000 mg/kg was shoot growth significantly inhibited. Zn solubilized from ZnO NPs correlated with root growth inhibition (r(2)= 0.8709); solubility of Fe (r(2)= 0.916) and Mn (r(2)= 0.997), and shoot accumulation of Zn (r(2)= 0.9095), Fe (r(2)= 0.9422) and Mn (r(2)= 0.789). Root ferric reductase activity diminished 31% in NP-exposed plants. Amendments with Zn ions at 6 mg/kg, corresponding to Zn solubilized from the NPs, did not replicate the responses, suggesting a nano-specific contribution of the ZnO. Neither NPs (500 mg Zn/kg) nor Zn ions affected root colonization by PcO6. Siderophore production by PcO6 increased 17% by exposure to NPs and 11% with Zn ions (18 mg/kg). PcO6 restored plant ferric reduction under NP exposure, but decreased uptake of Zn and Fe, 58 and 18%, respectively, suggesting soil bacteria could reduce plant accumulation of metals under toxic exposure levels, while negatively affecting uptake of essential elements. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that growth and balance of essential metals in bean exposed to ZnO NPs were influenced by the NPs and bacterial colonization of NP-exposed roots, indicating subtle effects of NPs in plant nutrition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology .No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24713073

Citation

Dimkpa, Christian O., et al. "ZnO Nanoparticles and Root Colonization By a Beneficial Pseudomonad Influence Essential Metal Responses in Bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris)." Nanotoxicology, vol. 9, no. 3, 2015, pp. 271-8.
Dimkpa CO, Hansen T, Stewart J, et al. ZnO nanoparticles and root colonization by a beneficial pseudomonad influence essential metal responses in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Nanotoxicology. 2015;9(3):271-8.
Dimkpa, C. O., Hansen, T., Stewart, J., McLean, J. E., Britt, D. W., & Anderson, A. J. (2015). ZnO nanoparticles and root colonization by a beneficial pseudomonad influence essential metal responses in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Nanotoxicology, 9(3), 271-8. https://doi.org/10.3109/17435390.2014.900583
Dimkpa CO, et al. ZnO Nanoparticles and Root Colonization By a Beneficial Pseudomonad Influence Essential Metal Responses in Bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris). Nanotoxicology. 2015;9(3):271-8. PubMed PMID: 24713073.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - ZnO nanoparticles and root colonization by a beneficial pseudomonad influence essential metal responses in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). AU - Dimkpa,Christian O, AU - Hansen,Trevor, AU - Stewart,Jacob, AU - McLean,Joan E, AU - Britt,David W, AU - Anderson,Anne J, Y1 - 2014/04/09/ PY - 2014/4/10/entrez PY - 2014/4/10/pubmed PY - 2016/2/9/medline KW - Metal accumulation KW - Phaseolus vulgaris KW - Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 KW - ZnO nanoparticles KW - microbial siderophores KW - solubility SP - 271 EP - 8 JF - Nanotoxicology JO - Nanotoxicology VL - 9 IS - 3 N2 - Nanoparticles (NPs) incorporated into commercial products are reactive on plants. Here, the influence of a root-associated bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 (PcO6) on the responses of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) to commercial ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) was examined. ZnO NPs (250-1000 mg Zn/kg) significantly (p = 0.05) impacted root elongation after 7 days; only at 1000 mg/kg was shoot growth significantly inhibited. Zn solubilized from ZnO NPs correlated with root growth inhibition (r(2)= 0.8709); solubility of Fe (r(2)= 0.916) and Mn (r(2)= 0.997), and shoot accumulation of Zn (r(2)= 0.9095), Fe (r(2)= 0.9422) and Mn (r(2)= 0.789). Root ferric reductase activity diminished 31% in NP-exposed plants. Amendments with Zn ions at 6 mg/kg, corresponding to Zn solubilized from the NPs, did not replicate the responses, suggesting a nano-specific contribution of the ZnO. Neither NPs (500 mg Zn/kg) nor Zn ions affected root colonization by PcO6. Siderophore production by PcO6 increased 17% by exposure to NPs and 11% with Zn ions (18 mg/kg). PcO6 restored plant ferric reduction under NP exposure, but decreased uptake of Zn and Fe, 58 and 18%, respectively, suggesting soil bacteria could reduce plant accumulation of metals under toxic exposure levels, while negatively affecting uptake of essential elements. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that growth and balance of essential metals in bean exposed to ZnO NPs were influenced by the NPs and bacterial colonization of NP-exposed roots, indicating subtle effects of NPs in plant nutrition. SN - 1743-5404 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24713073/ZnO_nanoparticles_and_root_colonization_by_a_beneficial_pseudomonad_influence_essential_metal_responses_in_bean__Phaseolus_vulgaris__ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/17435390.2014.900583 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -