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Managing dental fear and anxiety in pediatric patients: A qualitative study from the public's perspective.
Pediatr Dent. 2014 Jan-Feb; 36(1):29-33.PD

Abstract

PURPOSE

Internet social media offers a rich source for soliciting the public's views on health issues. This qualitative research, using You-Tube as a platform, aimed to explore the public's perspectives on management of dental fear and anxiety (DFA) in pediatric patients.

METHODS

Using three keywords ("dental fear," "dental phobia," and "dental anxiety"), YouTube videos were searched. Twenty-seven videos related to DFA in children and adolescents were reviewed by three investigators, including a nondental layperson. Inductive thematic analysis was adopted for interpreting the data.

RESULTS

Several strategies were considered useful for controlling DFA in pediatric patients, including: verbal and nonverbal communication to establish closeness and effective guidance (explanation, permission-seeking, reassurance, and negotiation); desensitization to dental settings and procedures; tell-show-do; positive reinforcement; distraction by imagination and thoughtful designs of clinic; and parental presence and support. Some self-coping strategies adopted by patients alleviated their DFA, such as self-reasoning and trust-building through long-term connection. Dentists' clinical competence, favorable treatment outcomes, and state-of-the-art devices and technologies (dental lasers, intraoral camera, and adapted anaesthesia method) contributed to reducing DFA.

CONCLUSIONS

Authentic testimonials in YouTube videos endorsed and interpreted a variety of strategies adoptable by patients, parents, and dental professionals for managing children's and adolescents' dental fears and anxieties.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Lecturer, Faculty of Dentistry, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Selangor, Malaysia; a MDS student, Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics, the Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.Research assistant professor, Dental Public Health, the Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.Professor in pediatric dentistry and orthodontics, the Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong. ckyyiu@hkucc.hku.hk.Professor, Dental Public Health, the Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.Winthrop professor, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24717706

Citation

Hamzah, Hajar S., et al. "Managing Dental Fear and Anxiety in Pediatric Patients: a Qualitative Study From the Public's Perspective." Pediatric Dentistry, vol. 36, no. 1, 2014, pp. 29-33.
Hamzah HS, Gao X, Yung Yiu CK, et al. Managing dental fear and anxiety in pediatric patients: A qualitative study from the public's perspective. Pediatr Dent. 2014;36(1):29-33.
Hamzah, H. S., Gao, X., Yung Yiu, C. K., McGrath, C., & King, N. M. (2014). Managing dental fear and anxiety in pediatric patients: A qualitative study from the public's perspective. Pediatric Dentistry, 36(1), 29-33.
Hamzah HS, et al. Managing Dental Fear and Anxiety in Pediatric Patients: a Qualitative Study From the Public's Perspective. Pediatr Dent. 2014 Jan-Feb;36(1):29-33. PubMed PMID: 24717706.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Managing dental fear and anxiety in pediatric patients: A qualitative study from the public's perspective. AU - Hamzah,Hajar S, AU - Gao,Xiaoli, AU - Yung Yiu,Cynthia K, AU - McGrath,Colman, AU - King,Nigel M, PY - 2014/4/11/entrez PY - 2014/4/11/pubmed PY - 2015/1/13/medline SP - 29 EP - 33 JF - Pediatric dentistry JO - Pediatr Dent VL - 36 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: Internet social media offers a rich source for soliciting the public's views on health issues. This qualitative research, using You-Tube as a platform, aimed to explore the public's perspectives on management of dental fear and anxiety (DFA) in pediatric patients. METHODS: Using three keywords ("dental fear," "dental phobia," and "dental anxiety"), YouTube videos were searched. Twenty-seven videos related to DFA in children and adolescents were reviewed by three investigators, including a nondental layperson. Inductive thematic analysis was adopted for interpreting the data. RESULTS: Several strategies were considered useful for controlling DFA in pediatric patients, including: verbal and nonverbal communication to establish closeness and effective guidance (explanation, permission-seeking, reassurance, and negotiation); desensitization to dental settings and procedures; tell-show-do; positive reinforcement; distraction by imagination and thoughtful designs of clinic; and parental presence and support. Some self-coping strategies adopted by patients alleviated their DFA, such as self-reasoning and trust-building through long-term connection. Dentists' clinical competence, favorable treatment outcomes, and state-of-the-art devices and technologies (dental lasers, intraoral camera, and adapted anaesthesia method) contributed to reducing DFA. CONCLUSIONS: Authentic testimonials in YouTube videos endorsed and interpreted a variety of strategies adoptable by patients, parents, and dental professionals for managing children's and adolescents' dental fears and anxieties. SN - 1942-5473 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24717706/Managing_dental_fear_and_anxiety_in_pediatric_patients:_A_qualitative_study_from_the_public's_perspective_ L2 - https://www.ingentaconnect.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1942-5473&volume=36&issue=1&spage=29&aulast=Hamzah DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -