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National and state-specific estimates of place of influenza vaccination among adult populations - United States, 2011-12 influenza season.
Vaccine. 2014 May 30; 32(26):3198-204.V

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Annual influenza vaccination has been recommended for all persons ≥6 months since the 2010-11 season. New partnerships between public health agencies and medical and nonmedical vaccination providers have increased the number of vaccination providers and locations where vaccination services are delivered.

METHODS

Data from the 2011-12 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were analyzed. Point estimates of place of vaccination and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Multivariable logistic regression and predictive marginal modeling were conducted to identify factors associated with vaccination settings.

RESULTS

Among adults vaccinated during the 2011-12 influenza season, a doctor's office was the most common place (38.4%) for receipt of influenza vaccination, with stores (e.g., supermarkets or drug stores) (20.1%) the next common, and workplaces (17.6%) the third common. Overall, reported vaccination in nonmedical settings by state ranged from 32.2% in California to 60.4% in Nevada, with a median of 45.8%. Characteristics significantly associated with an increased likelihood of receipt of vaccination in nonmedical settings were higher education, not having certain identified high-risk conditions, not having had a routine checkup in the previous 12 months, and not having a primary doctor for health care. Being a member of a racial/ethnic minority group, unemployed or not in the work force were significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of receipt of vaccination in nonmedical settings.

CONCLUSION

Doctor's offices were the most common medical setting for adult influenza vaccination; workplaces and stores were important nonmedical settings. Increasing access to vaccination services in medical and nonmedical settings should be considered as important strategies for improving vaccination coverage. These results also can help guide development of strategies for achieving Healthy People 2020 objectives for influenza vaccination of adult populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States. Electronic address: lhp8@cdc.gov.Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States.Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States.Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States.Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States.Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Atlanta, GA 30333, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24731815

Citation

Lu, Peng-Jun, et al. "National and State-specific Estimates of Place of Influenza Vaccination Among Adult Populations - United States, 2011-12 Influenza Season." Vaccine, vol. 32, no. 26, 2014, pp. 3198-204.
Lu PJ, O'Halloran A, Ding H, et al. National and state-specific estimates of place of influenza vaccination among adult populations - United States, 2011-12 influenza season. Vaccine. 2014;32(26):3198-204.
Lu, P. J., O'Halloran, A., Ding, H., Williams, W. W., Bridges, C. B., & Kennedy, E. D. (2014). National and state-specific estimates of place of influenza vaccination among adult populations - United States, 2011-12 influenza season. Vaccine, 32(26), 3198-204. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.04.003
Lu PJ, et al. National and State-specific Estimates of Place of Influenza Vaccination Among Adult Populations - United States, 2011-12 Influenza Season. Vaccine. 2014 May 30;32(26):3198-204. PubMed PMID: 24731815.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - National and state-specific estimates of place of influenza vaccination among adult populations - United States, 2011-12 influenza season. AU - Lu,Peng-Jun, AU - O'Halloran,Alissa, AU - Ding,Helen, AU - Williams,Walter W, AU - Bridges,Carolyn B, AU - Kennedy,Erin D, Y1 - 2014/04/13/ PY - 2014/01/02/received PY - 2014/03/14/revised PY - 2014/04/01/accepted PY - 2014/4/16/entrez PY - 2014/4/16/pubmed PY - 2014/11/18/medline KW - Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) KW - Influenza vaccination KW - Medical setting KW - Nonmedical setting KW - Place of influenza vaccination SP - 3198 EP - 204 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 32 IS - 26 N2 - BACKGROUND: Annual influenza vaccination has been recommended for all persons ≥6 months since the 2010-11 season. New partnerships between public health agencies and medical and nonmedical vaccination providers have increased the number of vaccination providers and locations where vaccination services are delivered. METHODS: Data from the 2011-12 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were analyzed. Point estimates of place of vaccination and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Multivariable logistic regression and predictive marginal modeling were conducted to identify factors associated with vaccination settings. RESULTS: Among adults vaccinated during the 2011-12 influenza season, a doctor's office was the most common place (38.4%) for receipt of influenza vaccination, with stores (e.g., supermarkets or drug stores) (20.1%) the next common, and workplaces (17.6%) the third common. Overall, reported vaccination in nonmedical settings by state ranged from 32.2% in California to 60.4% in Nevada, with a median of 45.8%. Characteristics significantly associated with an increased likelihood of receipt of vaccination in nonmedical settings were higher education, not having certain identified high-risk conditions, not having had a routine checkup in the previous 12 months, and not having a primary doctor for health care. Being a member of a racial/ethnic minority group, unemployed or not in the work force were significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of receipt of vaccination in nonmedical settings. CONCLUSION: Doctor's offices were the most common medical setting for adult influenza vaccination; workplaces and stores were important nonmedical settings. Increasing access to vaccination services in medical and nonmedical settings should be considered as important strategies for improving vaccination coverage. These results also can help guide development of strategies for achieving Healthy People 2020 objectives for influenza vaccination of adult populations. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24731815/National_and_state_specific_estimates_of_place_of_influenza_vaccination_among_adult_populations___United_States_2011_12_influenza_season_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(14)00505-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -