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Iron-containing micronutrient supplementation of Chinese women with no or mild anemia during pregnancy improved iron status but did not affect perinatal anemia.
J Nutr. 2014 Jun; 144(6):943-8.JN

Abstract

Universal prenatal daily iron-folic acid (IFA) and multiple micronutrient (MM) supplements are recommended to reduce the risk of low birth weight, maternal anemia, and iron deficiency (ID) during pregnancy, but the evidence of their effect on iron status among women with mild or no anemia is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the iron status [serum ferritin (SF), serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and body iron (BI)] before and after micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy. We examined 834 pregnant women with hemoglobin > 100 g/L at enrollment before 20 wk of gestation and with iron measurement data from a subset of a randomized, double-blind trial in China. Women were randomly assigned to take daily 400 μg of folic acid (FA) (control), FA plus 30 mg of iron, or FA, iron, plus 13 additional MMs provided before 20 wk of gestation to delivery. Venous blood was collected in this subset during study enrollment (before 20 wk of gestation) and 28-32 wk of gestation. We found that, at 28-32 wk of gestation, compared with the FA group, both the IFA and MM groups had significantly lower prevalence of ID regardless of which indicator (SF, sTfR, or BI) was used for defining ID. The prevalence of ID at 28-32 wk of gestation for IFA, MM, and FA were 35.3%, 42.7%, and 59.6% by using low SF, 53.6%, 59.9%, and 69.9% by using high sTfR, and 34.5%, 41.2%, and 59.6% by using low BI, respectively. However, there was no difference in anemia prevalence (hemoglobin < 110 g/L) between FA and IFA or MM groups. We concluded that, compared with FA alone, prenatal IFA and MM supplements provided to women with no or mild anemia improved iron status later during pregnancy but did not affect perinatal anemia. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00137744.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, GA; and.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, GA; and.Peking University Institute of Reproductive and Child Health/Ministry of Health Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, GA; and.Peking University Institute of Reproductive and Child Health/Ministry of Health Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China.Peking University Institute of Reproductive and Child Health/Ministry of Health Key Laboratory of Reproductive Health, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China yerw@bjmu.edu.cn.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, GA; and.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24744317

Citation

Mei, Zuguo, et al. "Iron-containing Micronutrient Supplementation of Chinese Women With No or Mild Anemia During Pregnancy Improved Iron Status but Did Not Affect Perinatal Anemia." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 144, no. 6, 2014, pp. 943-8.
Mei Z, Serdula MK, Liu JM, et al. Iron-containing micronutrient supplementation of Chinese women with no or mild anemia during pregnancy improved iron status but did not affect perinatal anemia. J Nutr. 2014;144(6):943-8.
Mei, Z., Serdula, M. K., Liu, J. M., Flores-Ayala, R. C., Wang, L., Ye, R., & Grummer-Strawn, L. M. (2014). Iron-containing micronutrient supplementation of Chinese women with no or mild anemia during pregnancy improved iron status but did not affect perinatal anemia. The Journal of Nutrition, 144(6), 943-8. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.113.189894
Mei Z, et al. Iron-containing Micronutrient Supplementation of Chinese Women With No or Mild Anemia During Pregnancy Improved Iron Status but Did Not Affect Perinatal Anemia. J Nutr. 2014;144(6):943-8. PubMed PMID: 24744317.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron-containing micronutrient supplementation of Chinese women with no or mild anemia during pregnancy improved iron status but did not affect perinatal anemia. AU - Mei,Zuguo, AU - Serdula,Mary K, AU - Liu,Jian-Meng, AU - Flores-Ayala,Rafael C, AU - Wang,Linlin, AU - Ye,Rongwei, AU - Grummer-Strawn,Laurence M, Y1 - 2014/04/17/ PY - 2014/4/19/entrez PY - 2014/4/20/pubmed PY - 2014/7/8/medline SP - 943 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 144 IS - 6 N2 - Universal prenatal daily iron-folic acid (IFA) and multiple micronutrient (MM) supplements are recommended to reduce the risk of low birth weight, maternal anemia, and iron deficiency (ID) during pregnancy, but the evidence of their effect on iron status among women with mild or no anemia is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the iron status [serum ferritin (SF), serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and body iron (BI)] before and after micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy. We examined 834 pregnant women with hemoglobin > 100 g/L at enrollment before 20 wk of gestation and with iron measurement data from a subset of a randomized, double-blind trial in China. Women were randomly assigned to take daily 400 μg of folic acid (FA) (control), FA plus 30 mg of iron, or FA, iron, plus 13 additional MMs provided before 20 wk of gestation to delivery. Venous blood was collected in this subset during study enrollment (before 20 wk of gestation) and 28-32 wk of gestation. We found that, at 28-32 wk of gestation, compared with the FA group, both the IFA and MM groups had significantly lower prevalence of ID regardless of which indicator (SF, sTfR, or BI) was used for defining ID. The prevalence of ID at 28-32 wk of gestation for IFA, MM, and FA were 35.3%, 42.7%, and 59.6% by using low SF, 53.6%, 59.9%, and 69.9% by using high sTfR, and 34.5%, 41.2%, and 59.6% by using low BI, respectively. However, there was no difference in anemia prevalence (hemoglobin < 110 g/L) between FA and IFA or MM groups. We concluded that, compared with FA alone, prenatal IFA and MM supplements provided to women with no or mild anemia improved iron status later during pregnancy but did not affect perinatal anemia. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00137744. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24744317/Iron_containing_micronutrient_supplementation_of_Chinese_women_with_no_or_mild_anemia_during_pregnancy_improved_iron_status_but_did_not_affect_perinatal_anemia_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.113.189894 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -