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Cannabis withdrawal in patients with and without opioid dependence.
Subst Abus 2014; 35(3):230-4SA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Cannabis use is common among opioid-dependent individuals, but little is known about cannabis withdrawal in this population.

METHODS

Thirty inpatients (57% men) completed the Marijuana Quit Questionnaire (MJQQ) after completing acute heroin detoxification treatment in Saint Petersburg, Russia. The MJQQ collected data on motivations for quitting, withdrawal symptoms, and coping strategies used to help maintain abstinence during their most "serious" (self-defined) quit attempt made without formal treatment outside a controlled environment.

RESULTS

At the start of their quit attempt, 70% of participants smoked cannabis at least weekly (40% daily), averaging [SD] 2.73 [1.95] joints daily; 60% were heroin dependent. Subjects with heroin dependence were significantly older at the start of their quit attempt (22.9 [3.6] vs. 19.1 [2.9] years), were significantly less likely to report withdrawal irritability/anger/aggression (22% vs. 58%), restlessness (0% vs. 25%), or physical symptoms (6% vs. 33%), or to meet diagnostic criteria for DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition) cannabis withdrawal syndrome (6% vs. 33%), and had shorter duration of abstinence (29.6 [28.7] vs 73.7 [44.1] months) than those without heroin dependence.

CONCLUSION

Cannabis users with opioid dependence are less likely to experience cannabis withdrawal, suggesting that opiate use may prevent or mask the experience of cannabis withdrawal. RESULTS should be considered preliminary due to small convenience sample and retrospective data.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Centre d'étude et de recherche en psychopathologie (CERPP) , Université de Toulouse-Le Mirail , Toulouse , France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24745656

Citation

Chauchard, Emeline, et al. "Cannabis Withdrawal in Patients With and Without Opioid Dependence." Substance Abuse, vol. 35, no. 3, 2014, pp. 230-4.
Chauchard E, Goncharov O, Krupitsky E, et al. Cannabis withdrawal in patients with and without opioid dependence. Subst Abus. 2014;35(3):230-4.
Chauchard, E., Goncharov, O., Krupitsky, E., & Gorelick, D. A. (2014). Cannabis withdrawal in patients with and without opioid dependence. Substance Abuse, 35(3), pp. 230-4. doi:10.1080/08897077.2014.898605.
Chauchard E, et al. Cannabis Withdrawal in Patients With and Without Opioid Dependence. Subst Abus. 2014;35(3):230-4. PubMed PMID: 24745656.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cannabis withdrawal in patients with and without opioid dependence. AU - Chauchard,Emeline, AU - Goncharov,Oleg, AU - Krupitsky,Evgeny, AU - Gorelick,David A, PY - 2014/4/22/entrez PY - 2014/4/22/pubmed PY - 2015/9/30/medline KW - Cannabis KW - opioids KW - withdrawal SP - 230 EP - 4 JF - Substance abuse JO - Subst Abus VL - 35 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Cannabis use is common among opioid-dependent individuals, but little is known about cannabis withdrawal in this population. METHODS: Thirty inpatients (57% men) completed the Marijuana Quit Questionnaire (MJQQ) after completing acute heroin detoxification treatment in Saint Petersburg, Russia. The MJQQ collected data on motivations for quitting, withdrawal symptoms, and coping strategies used to help maintain abstinence during their most "serious" (self-defined) quit attempt made without formal treatment outside a controlled environment. RESULTS: At the start of their quit attempt, 70% of participants smoked cannabis at least weekly (40% daily), averaging [SD] 2.73 [1.95] joints daily; 60% were heroin dependent. Subjects with heroin dependence were significantly older at the start of their quit attempt (22.9 [3.6] vs. 19.1 [2.9] years), were significantly less likely to report withdrawal irritability/anger/aggression (22% vs. 58%), restlessness (0% vs. 25%), or physical symptoms (6% vs. 33%), or to meet diagnostic criteria for DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition) cannabis withdrawal syndrome (6% vs. 33%), and had shorter duration of abstinence (29.6 [28.7] vs 73.7 [44.1] months) than those without heroin dependence. CONCLUSION: Cannabis users with opioid dependence are less likely to experience cannabis withdrawal, suggesting that opiate use may prevent or mask the experience of cannabis withdrawal. RESULTS should be considered preliminary due to small convenience sample and retrospective data. SN - 1547-0164 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24745656/Cannabis_withdrawal_in_patients_with_and_without_opioid_dependence_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08897077.2014.898605 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -