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Probiotic viability and storage stability of yogurts and fermented milks prepared with several mixtures of lactic acid bacteria.
J Dairy Sci. 2014 May; 97(5):2578-90.JD

Abstract

Currently, the food industry wants to expand the range of probiotic yogurts but each probiotic bacteria offers different and specific health benefits. Little information exists on the influence of probiotic strains on physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics of yogurts and fermented milks. Six probiotic yogurts or fermented milks and 1 control yogurt were prepared, and we evaluated several physicochemical properties (pH, titratable acidity, texture, color, and syneresis), microbial viability of starter cultures (Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) and probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus reuteri) during fermentation and storage (35 d at 5°C), as well as sensory preference among them. Decreases in pH (0.17 to 0.50 units) and increases in titratable acidity (0.09 to 0.29%) were observed during storage. Only the yogurt with S. thermophilus, L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and L. reuteri differed in firmness. No differences in adhesiveness were determined among the tested yogurts, fermented milks, and the control. Syneresis was in the range of 45 to 58%. No changes in color during storage were observed and no color differences were detected among the evaluated fermented milk products. Counts of S. thermophilus decreased from 1.8 to 3.5 log during storage. Counts of L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus also decreased in probiotic yogurts and varied from 30 to 50% of initial population. Probiotic bacteria also lost viability throughout storage, although the 3 probiotic fermented milks maintained counts ≥ 10(7)cfu/mL for 3 wk. Probiotic bacteria had variable viability in yogurts, maintaining counts of L. acidophilus ≥ 10(7) cfu/mL for 35 d, of L. casei for 7d, and of L. reuteri for 14 d. We found no significant sensory preference among the 6 probiotic yogurts and fermented milks or the control. However, the yogurt and fermented milk made with L. casei were better accepted. This study presents relevant information on physicochemical, sensory, and microbial properties of probiotic yogurts and fermented milks, which could guide the dairy industry in developing new probiotic products.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Alimentos y Ambiental, Universidad de las Américas Puebla, Cholula, Puebla 72810, México.Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Alimentos y Ambiental, Universidad de las Américas Puebla, Cholula, Puebla 72810, México.Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Alimentos y Ambiental, Universidad de las Américas Puebla, Cholula, Puebla 72810, México. Electronic address: aurelio.lopezm@udlap.mx.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24745665

Citation

Mani-López, E, et al. "Probiotic Viability and Storage Stability of Yogurts and Fermented Milks Prepared With Several Mixtures of Lactic Acid Bacteria." Journal of Dairy Science, vol. 97, no. 5, 2014, pp. 2578-90.
Mani-López E, Palou E, López-Malo A. Probiotic viability and storage stability of yogurts and fermented milks prepared with several mixtures of lactic acid bacteria. J Dairy Sci. 2014;97(5):2578-90.
Mani-López, E., Palou, E., & López-Malo, A. (2014). Probiotic viability and storage stability of yogurts and fermented milks prepared with several mixtures of lactic acid bacteria. Journal of Dairy Science, 97(5), 2578-90. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.2013-7551
Mani-López E, Palou E, López-Malo A. Probiotic Viability and Storage Stability of Yogurts and Fermented Milks Prepared With Several Mixtures of Lactic Acid Bacteria. J Dairy Sci. 2014;97(5):2578-90. PubMed PMID: 24745665.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Probiotic viability and storage stability of yogurts and fermented milks prepared with several mixtures of lactic acid bacteria. AU - Mani-López,E, AU - Palou,E, AU - López-Malo,A, PY - 2013/10/01/received PY - 2014/01/18/accepted PY - 2014/4/22/entrez PY - 2014/4/22/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline KW - fermented milk KW - microbial viability KW - probiotic yogurt KW - storage stability SP - 2578 EP - 90 JF - Journal of dairy science JO - J Dairy Sci VL - 97 IS - 5 N2 - Currently, the food industry wants to expand the range of probiotic yogurts but each probiotic bacteria offers different and specific health benefits. Little information exists on the influence of probiotic strains on physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics of yogurts and fermented milks. Six probiotic yogurts or fermented milks and 1 control yogurt were prepared, and we evaluated several physicochemical properties (pH, titratable acidity, texture, color, and syneresis), microbial viability of starter cultures (Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) and probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus reuteri) during fermentation and storage (35 d at 5°C), as well as sensory preference among them. Decreases in pH (0.17 to 0.50 units) and increases in titratable acidity (0.09 to 0.29%) were observed during storage. Only the yogurt with S. thermophilus, L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and L. reuteri differed in firmness. No differences in adhesiveness were determined among the tested yogurts, fermented milks, and the control. Syneresis was in the range of 45 to 58%. No changes in color during storage were observed and no color differences were detected among the evaluated fermented milk products. Counts of S. thermophilus decreased from 1.8 to 3.5 log during storage. Counts of L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus also decreased in probiotic yogurts and varied from 30 to 50% of initial population. Probiotic bacteria also lost viability throughout storage, although the 3 probiotic fermented milks maintained counts ≥ 10(7)cfu/mL for 3 wk. Probiotic bacteria had variable viability in yogurts, maintaining counts of L. acidophilus ≥ 10(7) cfu/mL for 35 d, of L. casei for 7d, and of L. reuteri for 14 d. We found no significant sensory preference among the 6 probiotic yogurts and fermented milks or the control. However, the yogurt and fermented milk made with L. casei were better accepted. This study presents relevant information on physicochemical, sensory, and microbial properties of probiotic yogurts and fermented milks, which could guide the dairy industry in developing new probiotic products. SN - 1525-3198 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24745665/Probiotic_viability_and_storage_stability_of_yogurts_and_fermented_milks_prepared_with_several_mixtures_of_lactic_acid_bacteria_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-0302(14)00254-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -