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Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of nonpharmaceutical interventions following school dismissals during the 2009 Influenza A H1N1 pandemic in Michigan, United States.
PLoS One. 2014; 9(4):e94290.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Many schools throughout the United States reported an increase in dismissals due to the 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1). During the fall months of 2009, more than 567 school dismissals were reported from the state of Michigan. In December 2009, the Michigan Department of Community Health, in collaboration with the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, conducted a survey to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAPs) of households with school-aged children and classroom teachers regarding the recommended use of nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) to slow the spread of influenza.

METHODS

A random sample of eight elementary schools (kindergarten through 5th grade) was selected from each of the eight public health preparedness regions in the state. Within each selected school, a single classroom was randomly identified from each grade (K-5), and household caregivers of the classroom students and their respective teachers were asked to participate in the survey.

RESULTS

In total, 26% (2,188/8,280) of household caregivers and 45% (163/360) of teachers from 48 schools (of the 64 sampled) responded to the survey. Of the 48 participating schools, 27% (13) experienced a school dismissal during the 2009 fall term. Eighty-seven percent (1,806/2,082) of caregivers and 80% (122/152) of teachers thought that the 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic was severe, and >90% of both groups indicated that they told their children/students to use NPIs, such as washing hands more often and covering coughs with tissues, to prevent infection with influenza.

CONCLUSIONS

Knowledge and instruction on the use of NPIs appeared to be high among household caregivers and teachers responding to the survey. Nevertheless, public health officials should continue to explain the public health rationale for NPIs to reduce pandemic influenza. Ensuring this information is communicated to household caregivers and teachers through trusted sources is essential.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Eagle Medical Services, San Antonio, Texas, United States of America.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America.Michigan Department of Community Health, Bureau of Epidemiology, Lansing, Michigan, United States of America.Michigan State University Program in Public Health, East Lansing, Michigan, United States of America.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24747300

Citation

Shi, Jianrong, et al. "Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Nonpharmaceutical Interventions Following School Dismissals During the 2009 Influenza a H1N1 Pandemic in Michigan, United States." PloS One, vol. 9, no. 4, 2014, pp. e94290.
Shi J, Njai R, Wells E, et al. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of nonpharmaceutical interventions following school dismissals during the 2009 Influenza A H1N1 pandemic in Michigan, United States. PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e94290.
Shi, J., Njai, R., Wells, E., Collins, J., Wilkins, M., Dooyema, C., Sinclair, J., Gao, H., & Rainey, J. J. (2014). Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of nonpharmaceutical interventions following school dismissals during the 2009 Influenza A H1N1 pandemic in Michigan, United States. PloS One, 9(4), e94290. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0094290
Shi J, et al. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Nonpharmaceutical Interventions Following School Dismissals During the 2009 Influenza a H1N1 Pandemic in Michigan, United States. PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e94290. PubMed PMID: 24747300.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of nonpharmaceutical interventions following school dismissals during the 2009 Influenza A H1N1 pandemic in Michigan, United States. AU - Shi,Jianrong, AU - Njai,Rashid, AU - Wells,Eden, AU - Collins,Jim, AU - Wilkins,Melinda, AU - Dooyema,Carrie, AU - Sinclair,Julie, AU - Gao,Hongjiang, AU - Rainey,Jeanette J, Y1 - 2014/04/18/ PY - 2013/07/26/received PY - 2014/03/14/accepted PY - 2014/4/22/entrez PY - 2014/4/22/pubmed PY - 2015/1/16/medline SP - e94290 EP - e94290 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 9 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Many schools throughout the United States reported an increase in dismissals due to the 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1). During the fall months of 2009, more than 567 school dismissals were reported from the state of Michigan. In December 2009, the Michigan Department of Community Health, in collaboration with the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, conducted a survey to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAPs) of households with school-aged children and classroom teachers regarding the recommended use of nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) to slow the spread of influenza. METHODS: A random sample of eight elementary schools (kindergarten through 5th grade) was selected from each of the eight public health preparedness regions in the state. Within each selected school, a single classroom was randomly identified from each grade (K-5), and household caregivers of the classroom students and their respective teachers were asked to participate in the survey. RESULTS: In total, 26% (2,188/8,280) of household caregivers and 45% (163/360) of teachers from 48 schools (of the 64 sampled) responded to the survey. Of the 48 participating schools, 27% (13) experienced a school dismissal during the 2009 fall term. Eighty-seven percent (1,806/2,082) of caregivers and 80% (122/152) of teachers thought that the 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic was severe, and >90% of both groups indicated that they told their children/students to use NPIs, such as washing hands more often and covering coughs with tissues, to prevent infection with influenza. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge and instruction on the use of NPIs appeared to be high among household caregivers and teachers responding to the survey. Nevertheless, public health officials should continue to explain the public health rationale for NPIs to reduce pandemic influenza. Ensuring this information is communicated to household caregivers and teachers through trusted sources is essential. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24747300/Knowledge_attitudes_and_practices_of_nonpharmaceutical_interventions_following_school_dismissals_during_the_2009_Influenza_A_H1N1_pandemic_in_Michigan_United_States_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0094290 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -