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Adolescent MDMA exposure diminishes the physiological and neurotoxic consequences of an MDMA binge in female rats.
Dev Psychobiol 2014; 56(5):924-34DP

Abstract

Intermittent MDMA pretreatment blocked the reductions in serotonin transporter (SERT) binding induced by an MDMA binge in a prior study in adolescent male rats. The objective of this investigation was to determine if the physiological, behavioral, and neurochemical responses to MDMA are sexually dimorphic. Female Sprague-Dawley rats received MDMA (10 mg/kg × 2) or Saline on every fifth day from postnatal day (PD) 35-60 and an MDMA binge (5 mg/kg × 4) on PD 67. The MDMA binge induced a pronounced temperature dysregulation in MDMA-naïve, but not MDMA-pretreated, groups. Similarly, MDMA-pretreated animals were resistant to the binge-induced SERT reductions, especially in the hippocampus. Motor activity at PD 68 was not reduced by the binge, unlike the responses found in males. These results show that female rats differ from males in their responses to an MDMA binge but are similar with respect to preconditioning from prior MDMA exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuroscience & Behavior Program, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 01003. piperbj@husson.edu, psy391@gmail.com.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24752593

Citation

Piper, Brian J., et al. "Adolescent MDMA Exposure Diminishes the Physiological and Neurotoxic Consequences of an MDMA Binge in Female Rats." Developmental Psychobiology, vol. 56, no. 5, 2014, pp. 924-34.
Piper BJ, Henderson CS, Meyer JS. Adolescent MDMA exposure diminishes the physiological and neurotoxic consequences of an MDMA binge in female rats. Dev Psychobiol. 2014;56(5):924-34.
Piper, B. J., Henderson, C. S., & Meyer, J. S. (2014). Adolescent MDMA exposure diminishes the physiological and neurotoxic consequences of an MDMA binge in female rats. Developmental Psychobiology, 56(5), pp. 924-34. doi:10.1002/dev.21169.
Piper BJ, Henderson CS, Meyer JS. Adolescent MDMA Exposure Diminishes the Physiological and Neurotoxic Consequences of an MDMA Binge in Female Rats. Dev Psychobiol. 2014;56(5):924-34. PubMed PMID: 24752593.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adolescent MDMA exposure diminishes the physiological and neurotoxic consequences of an MDMA binge in female rats. AU - Piper,Brian J, AU - Henderson,Christina S, AU - Meyer,Jerrold S, Y1 - 2013/10/08/ PY - 2013/06/09/received PY - 2013/09/06/accepted PY - 2014/4/23/entrez PY - 2014/4/23/pubmed PY - 2015/1/15/medline KW - activity KW - ecstasy KW - hangover KW - hyperthermia KW - hypothermia KW - preconditioning KW - rat KW - serotonin transporter KW - sex KW - temperature KW - weight SP - 924 EP - 34 JF - Developmental psychobiology JO - Dev Psychobiol VL - 56 IS - 5 N2 - Intermittent MDMA pretreatment blocked the reductions in serotonin transporter (SERT) binding induced by an MDMA binge in a prior study in adolescent male rats. The objective of this investigation was to determine if the physiological, behavioral, and neurochemical responses to MDMA are sexually dimorphic. Female Sprague-Dawley rats received MDMA (10 mg/kg × 2) or Saline on every fifth day from postnatal day (PD) 35-60 and an MDMA binge (5 mg/kg × 4) on PD 67. The MDMA binge induced a pronounced temperature dysregulation in MDMA-naïve, but not MDMA-pretreated, groups. Similarly, MDMA-pretreated animals were resistant to the binge-induced SERT reductions, especially in the hippocampus. Motor activity at PD 68 was not reduced by the binge, unlike the responses found in males. These results show that female rats differ from males in their responses to an MDMA binge but are similar with respect to preconditioning from prior MDMA exposure. SN - 1098-2302 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24752593/Adolescent_MDMA_exposure_diminishes_the_physiological_and_neurotoxic_consequences_of_an_MDMA_binge_in_female_rats_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/dev.21169 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -