Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Neurobehaviour between birth and 40 weeks' gestation in infants born <30 weeks' gestation and parental psychological wellbeing: predictors of brain development and child outcomes.
BMC Pediatr. 2014 Apr 24; 14:111.BPed

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Infants born <30 weeks' gestation are at increased risk of long term neurodevelopmental problems compared with term born peers. The predictive value of neurobehavioural examinations at term equivalent age in very preterm infants has been reported for subsequent impairment. Yet there is little knowledge surrounding earlier neurobehavioural development in preterm infants prior to term equivalent age, and how it relates to perinatal factors, cerebral structure, and later developmental outcomes. In addition, maternal psychological wellbeing has been associated with child development. Given the high rate of psychological distress reported by parents of preterm children, it is vital we understand maternal and paternal wellbeing in the early weeks and months after preterm birth and how this influences the parent-child relationship and children's outcomes. Therefore this study aims to examine how 1) early neurobehaviour and 2) parental mental health relate to developmental outcomes for infants born preterm compared with infants born at term.

METHODS/DESIGN

This prospective cohort study will describe the neurobehaviour of 150 infants born at <30 weeks' gestational age from birth to term equivalent age, and explore how early neurobehavioural deficits relate to brain growth or injury determined by magnetic resonance imaging, perinatal factors, parental mental health and later developmental outcomes measured using standardised assessment tools at term, one and two years' corrected age. A control group of 150 healthy term-born infants will also be recruited for comparison of outcomes. To examine the effects of parental mental health on developmental outcomes, both parents of preterm and term-born infants will complete standardised questionnaires related to symptoms of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress at regular intervals from the first week of their child's birth until their child's second birthday. The parent-child relationship will be assessed at one and two years' corrected age.

DISCUSSION

Detailing the trajectory of infant neurobehaviour and parental psychological distress following very preterm birth is important not only to identify infants most at risk, further understand the parental experience and highlight potential times for intervention for the infant and/or parent, but also to gain insight into the effect this has on parent-child interaction and child development.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Victorian Infant Brain Studies, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, 4th Floor, Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia. alicia.spittle@mcri.edu.au.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24758605

Citation

Spittle, Alicia J., et al. "Neurobehaviour Between Birth and 40 Weeks' Gestation in Infants Born <30 Weeks' Gestation and Parental Psychological Wellbeing: Predictors of Brain Development and Child Outcomes." BMC Pediatrics, vol. 14, 2014, p. 111.
Spittle AJ, Thompson DK, Brown NC, et al. Neurobehaviour between birth and 40 weeks' gestation in infants born <30 weeks' gestation and parental psychological wellbeing: predictors of brain development and child outcomes. BMC Pediatr. 2014;14:111.
Spittle, A. J., Thompson, D. K., Brown, N. C., Treyvaud, K., Cheong, J. L., Lee, K. J., Pace, C. C., Olsen, J., Allinson, L. G., Morgan, A. T., Seal, M., Eeles, A., Judd, F., Doyle, L. W., & Anderson, P. J. (2014). Neurobehaviour between birth and 40 weeks' gestation in infants born <30 weeks' gestation and parental psychological wellbeing: predictors of brain development and child outcomes. BMC Pediatrics, 14, 111. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2431-14-111
Spittle AJ, et al. Neurobehaviour Between Birth and 40 Weeks' Gestation in Infants Born <30 Weeks' Gestation and Parental Psychological Wellbeing: Predictors of Brain Development and Child Outcomes. BMC Pediatr. 2014 Apr 24;14:111. PubMed PMID: 24758605.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neurobehaviour between birth and 40 weeks' gestation in infants born <30 weeks' gestation and parental psychological wellbeing: predictors of brain development and child outcomes. AU - Spittle,Alicia J, AU - Thompson,Deanne K, AU - Brown,Nisha C, AU - Treyvaud,Karli, AU - Cheong,Jeanie L Y, AU - Lee,Katherine J, AU - Pace,Carmen C, AU - Olsen,Joy, AU - Allinson,Leesa G, AU - Morgan,Angela T, AU - Seal,Marc, AU - Eeles,Abbey, AU - Judd,Fiona, AU - Doyle,Lex W, AU - Anderson,Peter J, Y1 - 2014/04/24/ PY - 2014/04/02/received PY - 2014/04/15/accepted PY - 2014/4/25/entrez PY - 2014/4/25/pubmed PY - 2015/1/23/medline SP - 111 EP - 111 JF - BMC pediatrics JO - BMC Pediatr VL - 14 N2 - BACKGROUND: Infants born <30 weeks' gestation are at increased risk of long term neurodevelopmental problems compared with term born peers. The predictive value of neurobehavioural examinations at term equivalent age in very preterm infants has been reported for subsequent impairment. Yet there is little knowledge surrounding earlier neurobehavioural development in preterm infants prior to term equivalent age, and how it relates to perinatal factors, cerebral structure, and later developmental outcomes. In addition, maternal psychological wellbeing has been associated with child development. Given the high rate of psychological distress reported by parents of preterm children, it is vital we understand maternal and paternal wellbeing in the early weeks and months after preterm birth and how this influences the parent-child relationship and children's outcomes. Therefore this study aims to examine how 1) early neurobehaviour and 2) parental mental health relate to developmental outcomes for infants born preterm compared with infants born at term. METHODS/DESIGN: This prospective cohort study will describe the neurobehaviour of 150 infants born at <30 weeks' gestational age from birth to term equivalent age, and explore how early neurobehavioural deficits relate to brain growth or injury determined by magnetic resonance imaging, perinatal factors, parental mental health and later developmental outcomes measured using standardised assessment tools at term, one and two years' corrected age. A control group of 150 healthy term-born infants will also be recruited for comparison of outcomes. To examine the effects of parental mental health on developmental outcomes, both parents of preterm and term-born infants will complete standardised questionnaires related to symptoms of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress at regular intervals from the first week of their child's birth until their child's second birthday. The parent-child relationship will be assessed at one and two years' corrected age. DISCUSSION: Detailing the trajectory of infant neurobehaviour and parental psychological distress following very preterm birth is important not only to identify infants most at risk, further understand the parental experience and highlight potential times for intervention for the infant and/or parent, but also to gain insight into the effect this has on parent-child interaction and child development. SN - 1471-2431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24758605/Neurobehaviour_between_birth_and_40_weeks'_gestation_in_infants_born_<30_weeks'_gestation_and_parental_psychological_wellbeing:_predictors_of_brain_development_and_child_outcomes_ L2 - https://bmcpediatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2431-14-111 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -