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High plasma homocysteine increases risk of metabolic syndrome in 6 to 8 year old children in rural Nepal.
Nutrients. 2014 Apr 21; 6(4):1649-61.N

Abstract

Little attention has been given to the association of plasma homocysteine (Hcy) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in children. We have evaluated the risk of MetS with plasma Hcy in a cohort of 6 to 8 year old rural Nepalese children, born to mothers who had participated in an antenatal micronutrient supplementation trial. We assessed Hcy in plasma from a random selection of n = 1000 children and determined the relationship of elevated Hcy (>12.0 μmol/L) to MetS (defined as the presence of any three of the following: abdominal adiposity (waist circumference ≥ 85th percentile of the study population), high plasma glucose (≥ 85th percentile), high systolic or diastolic blood pressure (≥ 90th percentile of reference population), triglyceride ≥ 1.7 mmol/L and high density lipoprotein < 0.9 mmol/L.) and its components. There was an increased risk of low high-density lipoproteins (HDL), [odds ratios (OR) = 1.77, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 1.08-2.88; p = 0.020], high blood pressure [OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.10-2.46; p = 0.015] and high body mass index (BMI) [OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.33-2.96; p = 0.001] with elevated Hcy. We observed an increased risk of MetS (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.06-2.90; p = 0.029) with elevated Hcy in age and gender-adjusted logistic regression models. High plasma Hcy is associated with increased risk of MetS and may have implications for chronic disease later in life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. myakub1@jhu.edu.Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. kschulz1@jhu.edu.Nepal Nutrition Intervention Project-Sarlahi, Tripureswor, Kathmandu 45104, Nepal. skk@mos.com.np.Program in International and Community Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. cpstewart@ucdavis.edu.Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. pchristi@jhsph.edu.Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. kwest@jhsph.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24763111

Citation

Yakub, Mohsin, et al. "High Plasma Homocysteine Increases Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in 6 to 8 Year Old Children in Rural Nepal." Nutrients, vol. 6, no. 4, 2014, pp. 1649-61.
Yakub M, Schulze KJ, Khatry SK, et al. High plasma homocysteine increases risk of metabolic syndrome in 6 to 8 year old children in rural Nepal. Nutrients. 2014;6(4):1649-61.
Yakub, M., Schulze, K. J., Khatry, S. K., Stewart, C. P., Christian, P., & West, K. P. (2014). High plasma homocysteine increases risk of metabolic syndrome in 6 to 8 year old children in rural Nepal. Nutrients, 6(4), 1649-61. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu6041649
Yakub M, et al. High Plasma Homocysteine Increases Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in 6 to 8 Year Old Children in Rural Nepal. Nutrients. 2014 Apr 21;6(4):1649-61. PubMed PMID: 24763111.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High plasma homocysteine increases risk of metabolic syndrome in 6 to 8 year old children in rural Nepal. AU - Yakub,Mohsin, AU - Schulze,Kerry J, AU - Khatry,Subarna K, AU - Stewart,Christine P, AU - Christian,Parul, AU - West,Keith P, Y1 - 2014/04/21/ PY - 2013/12/18/received PY - 2014/03/21/revised PY - 2014/04/02/accepted PY - 2014/4/26/entrez PY - 2014/4/26/pubmed PY - 2014/12/17/medline SP - 1649 EP - 61 JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 6 IS - 4 N2 - Little attention has been given to the association of plasma homocysteine (Hcy) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in children. We have evaluated the risk of MetS with plasma Hcy in a cohort of 6 to 8 year old rural Nepalese children, born to mothers who had participated in an antenatal micronutrient supplementation trial. We assessed Hcy in plasma from a random selection of n = 1000 children and determined the relationship of elevated Hcy (>12.0 μmol/L) to MetS (defined as the presence of any three of the following: abdominal adiposity (waist circumference ≥ 85th percentile of the study population), high plasma glucose (≥ 85th percentile), high systolic or diastolic blood pressure (≥ 90th percentile of reference population), triglyceride ≥ 1.7 mmol/L and high density lipoprotein < 0.9 mmol/L.) and its components. There was an increased risk of low high-density lipoproteins (HDL), [odds ratios (OR) = 1.77, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 1.08-2.88; p = 0.020], high blood pressure [OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.10-2.46; p = 0.015] and high body mass index (BMI) [OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.33-2.96; p = 0.001] with elevated Hcy. We observed an increased risk of MetS (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.06-2.90; p = 0.029) with elevated Hcy in age and gender-adjusted logistic regression models. High plasma Hcy is associated with increased risk of MetS and may have implications for chronic disease later in life. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24763111/High_plasma_homocysteine_increases_risk_of_metabolic_syndrome_in_6_to_8_year_old_children_in_rural_Nepal_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu6041649 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -