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Symptoms and occurrences of narcolepsy: a retrospective study of 162 patients during a 10-year period in eastern China.
Sleep Med. 2014 Jun; 15(6):607-13.SM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Our study was designed to assess symptomatology and occurrences of narcolepsy in eastern China between 2003 and 2012. Herein we report the substantial changes in the occurrence and clinical features of narcolepsy over the last decade in China.

METHODS

We performed a retrospective analysis of 162 Han Chinese patients with narcolepsy at Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai, China. Clinical histories and precipitating factors were recorded, in addition to narcolepsy and H1N1 winter flu pandemic (pH1N1) occurrences at Changzheng Hospital. The occurrences also were compared between the Changzheng Hospital and the People's Hospital, Beijing, China.

RESULTS

In our sample, narcolepsy occurred 1.73 times more frequently in men than in women. Most of the participants were children, which peaked to 91% in 2010. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), disrupted nocturnal sleep, cataplexy, and weight gain were the four major symptoms. We found that 40% of patients had identifiable precipitating factors. The occurrence of narcolepsy in 2010 showed an approximate three-fold difference from the baseline levels at the Changzheng Hospital, which showed positive relationships with occurrences of pH1N1 in Shanghai and the occurrence of narcolepsy at the People's Hospital.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings show the interactive effects of geography and H1N1 disease in relation to narcolepsy in Han Chinese populations, and strengthen the theoretic hypothesis that immune and mental factors facilitate the onset of narcolepsy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China; Institute of Neuroscience and MOE Key Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Neuroscience Research Center of Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.Department of Neurology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.Department of Psychiatry, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Department of Neurology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.Department of Neurology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.Department of Neurology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.Department of Neurology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.Department of Neurology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.Department of Neurology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China; Institute of Neuroscience and MOE Key Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Neuroscience Research Center of Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.Department of Neurology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China; Institute of Neuroscience and MOE Key Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Neuroscience Research Center of Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: zhaozx@medmail.com.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24767723

Citation

Wu, Huijuan, et al. "Symptoms and Occurrences of Narcolepsy: a Retrospective Study of 162 Patients During a 10-year Period in Eastern China." Sleep Medicine, vol. 15, no. 6, 2014, pp. 607-13.
Wu H, Zhuang J, Stone WS, et al. Symptoms and occurrences of narcolepsy: a retrospective study of 162 patients during a 10-year period in eastern China. Sleep Med. 2014;15(6):607-13.
Wu, H., Zhuang, J., Stone, W. S., Zhang, L., Zhao, Z., Wang, Z., Yang, Y., Li, X., Zhao, X., & Zhao, Z. (2014). Symptoms and occurrences of narcolepsy: a retrospective study of 162 patients during a 10-year period in eastern China. Sleep Medicine, 15(6), 607-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2013.12.012
Wu H, et al. Symptoms and Occurrences of Narcolepsy: a Retrospective Study of 162 Patients During a 10-year Period in Eastern China. Sleep Med. 2014;15(6):607-13. PubMed PMID: 24767723.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Symptoms and occurrences of narcolepsy: a retrospective study of 162 patients during a 10-year period in eastern China. AU - Wu,Huijuan, AU - Zhuang,Jianhua, AU - Stone,William S, AU - Zhang,Lin, AU - Zhao,Zhengqing, AU - Wang,Zongwen, AU - Yang,Yang, AU - Li,Xiang, AU - Zhao,Xiangxiang, AU - Zhao,Zhongxin, Y1 - 2014/02/17/ PY - 2013/10/25/received PY - 2013/12/12/revised PY - 2013/12/19/accepted PY - 2014/4/29/entrez PY - 2014/4/29/pubmed PY - 2015/2/13/medline KW - Cataplexy KW - Childhood KW - Excessive weight gain KW - H1N1 pandemic KW - Han Chinese KW - Narcolepsy KW - Precipitating factors SP - 607 EP - 13 JF - Sleep medicine JO - Sleep Med VL - 15 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Our study was designed to assess symptomatology and occurrences of narcolepsy in eastern China between 2003 and 2012. Herein we report the substantial changes in the occurrence and clinical features of narcolepsy over the last decade in China. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of 162 Han Chinese patients with narcolepsy at Changzheng Hospital, Shanghai, China. Clinical histories and precipitating factors were recorded, in addition to narcolepsy and H1N1 winter flu pandemic (pH1N1) occurrences at Changzheng Hospital. The occurrences also were compared between the Changzheng Hospital and the People's Hospital, Beijing, China. RESULTS: In our sample, narcolepsy occurred 1.73 times more frequently in men than in women. Most of the participants were children, which peaked to 91% in 2010. Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), disrupted nocturnal sleep, cataplexy, and weight gain were the four major symptoms. We found that 40% of patients had identifiable precipitating factors. The occurrence of narcolepsy in 2010 showed an approximate three-fold difference from the baseline levels at the Changzheng Hospital, which showed positive relationships with occurrences of pH1N1 in Shanghai and the occurrence of narcolepsy at the People's Hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show the interactive effects of geography and H1N1 disease in relation to narcolepsy in Han Chinese populations, and strengthen the theoretic hypothesis that immune and mental factors facilitate the onset of narcolepsy. SN - 1878-5506 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24767723/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1389-9457(14)00067-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -