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Injury outcomes in African American and African Caribbean women: the role of intimate partner violence.
J Emerg Nurs. 2015 Jan; 41(1):36-42.JE

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Intimate partner violence has been linked to increased and repeated injuries, as well as negative long-term physical and mental health outcomes. This study examines the prevalence and correlates of injury in women of African descent who reported recent intimate partner violence and control subjects who were never abused.

METHODS

African American and African Caribbean women aged 18 to 55 years were recruited from clinics in Baltimore, MD, and the US Virgin Islands. Self-reported demographics, partner violence history, and injury outcomes were collected. Associations between violence and injury outcomes were examined with logistic regression.

RESULTS

All injury outcomes were significantly more frequently reported in women who also reported recent partner violence than in women who were never abused. Multiple injuries were nearly 3 times more likely to be reported in women who had experienced recent abuse (adjusted odds ratio 2.75; 95% confidence interval 1.98-3.81). Reported injury outcomes were similar between the sites except that women in Baltimore were 66% more likely than their US Virgin Islands counterparts to report ED use in the past year (P = .001). In combined-site multivariable models, partner violence was associated with past-year ED use, hospitalization, and multiple injuries.

DISCUSSION

Injuries related to intimate partner violence may be part of the explanation for the negative long-term health outcomes. In this study, partner violence was associated with past-year ED use, hospitalization, and multiple injuries. Emergency nurses need to assess for intimate partner violence when women report with an injury to ensure that the violence is addressed in order to prevent repeated injuries and negative long-term health outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Baltimore, MD; La Jolla, CA; St Thomas, US Virgin Islands. Electronic address: jocelyna@jhu.edu.Baltimore, MD; La Jolla, CA; St Thomas, US Virgin Islands.Baltimore, MD; La Jolla, CA; St Thomas, US Virgin Islands.Baltimore, MD; La Jolla, CA; St Thomas, US Virgin Islands.Baltimore, MD; La Jolla, CA; St Thomas, US Virgin Islands.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24768096

Citation

Anderson, Jocelyn C., et al. "Injury Outcomes in African American and African Caribbean Women: the Role of Intimate Partner Violence." Journal of Emergency Nursing, vol. 41, no. 1, 2015, pp. 36-42.
Anderson JC, Stockman JK, Sabri B, et al. Injury outcomes in African American and African Caribbean women: the role of intimate partner violence. J Emerg Nurs. 2015;41(1):36-42.
Anderson, J. C., Stockman, J. K., Sabri, B., Campbell, D. W., & Campbell, J. C. (2015). Injury outcomes in African American and African Caribbean women: the role of intimate partner violence. Journal of Emergency Nursing, 41(1), 36-42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jen.2014.01.015
Anderson JC, et al. Injury Outcomes in African American and African Caribbean Women: the Role of Intimate Partner Violence. J Emerg Nurs. 2015;41(1):36-42. PubMed PMID: 24768096.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Injury outcomes in African American and African Caribbean women: the role of intimate partner violence. AU - Anderson,Jocelyn C, AU - Stockman,Jamila K, AU - Sabri,Bushra, AU - Campbell,Doris W, AU - Campbell,Jacquelyn C, Y1 - 2014/04/24/ PY - 2013/12/17/received PY - 2014/01/22/revised PY - 2014/01/31/accepted PY - 2014/4/29/entrez PY - 2014/4/29/pubmed PY - 2016/11/12/medline KW - Health care utilization KW - Injury KW - Intimate partner violence SP - 36 EP - 42 JF - Journal of emergency nursing JO - J Emerg Nurs VL - 41 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Intimate partner violence has been linked to increased and repeated injuries, as well as negative long-term physical and mental health outcomes. This study examines the prevalence and correlates of injury in women of African descent who reported recent intimate partner violence and control subjects who were never abused. METHODS: African American and African Caribbean women aged 18 to 55 years were recruited from clinics in Baltimore, MD, and the US Virgin Islands. Self-reported demographics, partner violence history, and injury outcomes were collected. Associations between violence and injury outcomes were examined with logistic regression. RESULTS: All injury outcomes were significantly more frequently reported in women who also reported recent partner violence than in women who were never abused. Multiple injuries were nearly 3 times more likely to be reported in women who had experienced recent abuse (adjusted odds ratio 2.75; 95% confidence interval 1.98-3.81). Reported injury outcomes were similar between the sites except that women in Baltimore were 66% more likely than their US Virgin Islands counterparts to report ED use in the past year (P = .001). In combined-site multivariable models, partner violence was associated with past-year ED use, hospitalization, and multiple injuries. DISCUSSION: Injuries related to intimate partner violence may be part of the explanation for the negative long-term health outcomes. In this study, partner violence was associated with past-year ED use, hospitalization, and multiple injuries. Emergency nurses need to assess for intimate partner violence when women report with an injury to ensure that the violence is addressed in order to prevent repeated injuries and negative long-term health outcomes. SN - 1527-2966 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24768096/Injury_outcomes_in_African_American_and_African_Caribbean_women:_the_role_of_intimate_partner_violence_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0099-1767(14)00048-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -