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The effectiveness of seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in preventing laboratory confirmed influenza hospitalisations in Auckland, New Zealand in 2012.
Vaccine. 2014 Jun 17; 32(29):3687-93.V

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Few studies report the effectiveness of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) in preventing hospitalisation for influenza-confirmed respiratory infections. Using a prospective surveillance platform, this study reports the first such estimate from a well-defined ethnically diverse population in New Zealand (NZ).

METHODS

A case test-negative design was used to estimate propensity adjusted vaccine effectiveness. Patients with a severe acute respiratory infection (SARI), defined as a patient of any age requiring hospitalisation with a history of a fever or a measured temperature ≥38°C and cough and onset within the past 7 days, admitted to public hospitals in South and Central Auckland were eligible for inclusion in the study. Cases were SARI patients who tested positive for influenza, while non-cases (controls) were SARI patients who tested negative. Results were adjusted for the propensity to be vaccinated and the timing of the influenza season.

RESULTS

The propensity and season adjusted vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated as 39% (95% CI 16;56). The VE point estimate against influenza A (H1N1) was lower than for influenza B or influenza A (H3N2) but confidence intervals were wide and overlapping. Estimated VE was 59% (95% CI 26;77) in patients aged 45-64 years but only 8% (-78;53) in those aged 65 years and above.

CONCLUSION

Prospective surveillance for SARI has been successfully established in NZ. This study for the first year, the 2012 influenza season, has shown low to moderate protection by TIV against influenza positive hospitalisation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Victoria St West, Auckland, New Zealand. Electronic address: n.turner@auckland.ac.nz.The University of Otago, PO Box 7343 Wellington South 6242, Wellington, New Zealand. Electronic address: nevil.pierse@otago.ac.nz.Institute of Environmental Science and Research, PO Box 40-158 Upper Hutt 5140, Wellington, New Zealand. Electronic address: Ange.Bissielo@esr.cri.nz.Institute of Environmental Science and Research, PO Box 40-158 Upper Hutt 5140, Wellington, New Zealand. Electronic address: Sue.Huang@esr.cri.nz.The University of Otago, PO Box 7343 Wellington South 6242, Wellington, New Zealand. Electronic address: michael.baker@otago.ac.nz.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. Electronic address: zux5@cdc.gov.The Australian National University, Canberra 0200, ACT, Australia; Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory, 10 Wrecklyn St., North Melbourne, 3051 Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: Heath.Kelly@mh.org.au.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24768730

Citation

Turner, Nikki, et al. "The Effectiveness of Seasonal Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine in Preventing Laboratory Confirmed Influenza Hospitalisations in Auckland, New Zealand in 2012." Vaccine, vol. 32, no. 29, 2014, pp. 3687-93.
Turner N, Pierse N, Bissielo A, et al. The effectiveness of seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in preventing laboratory confirmed influenza hospitalisations in Auckland, New Zealand in 2012. Vaccine. 2014;32(29):3687-93.
Turner, N., Pierse, N., Bissielo, A., Huang, Q. S., Baker, M. G., Widdowson, M. A., & Kelly, H. (2014). The effectiveness of seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in preventing laboratory confirmed influenza hospitalisations in Auckland, New Zealand in 2012. Vaccine, 32(29), 3687-93. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.04.013
Turner N, et al. The Effectiveness of Seasonal Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine in Preventing Laboratory Confirmed Influenza Hospitalisations in Auckland, New Zealand in 2012. Vaccine. 2014 Jun 17;32(29):3687-93. PubMed PMID: 24768730.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effectiveness of seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in preventing laboratory confirmed influenza hospitalisations in Auckland, New Zealand in 2012. AU - Turner,Nikki, AU - Pierse,Nevil, AU - Bissielo,Ange, AU - Huang,Q Sue, AU - Baker,Michael G, AU - Widdowson,Marc-Alain, AU - Kelly,Heath, AU - ,, Y1 - 2014/04/24/ PY - 2013/11/05/received PY - 2014/03/24/revised PY - 2014/04/02/accepted PY - 2014/4/29/entrez PY - 2014/4/29/pubmed PY - 2014/12/17/medline KW - Immunisation KW - Influenza vaccine KW - Vaccination KW - Vaccine effectiveness SP - 3687 EP - 93 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 32 IS - 29 N2 - BACKGROUND: Few studies report the effectiveness of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) in preventing hospitalisation for influenza-confirmed respiratory infections. Using a prospective surveillance platform, this study reports the first such estimate from a well-defined ethnically diverse population in New Zealand (NZ). METHODS: A case test-negative design was used to estimate propensity adjusted vaccine effectiveness. Patients with a severe acute respiratory infection (SARI), defined as a patient of any age requiring hospitalisation with a history of a fever or a measured temperature ≥38°C and cough and onset within the past 7 days, admitted to public hospitals in South and Central Auckland were eligible for inclusion in the study. Cases were SARI patients who tested positive for influenza, while non-cases (controls) were SARI patients who tested negative. Results were adjusted for the propensity to be vaccinated and the timing of the influenza season. RESULTS: The propensity and season adjusted vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated as 39% (95% CI 16;56). The VE point estimate against influenza A (H1N1) was lower than for influenza B or influenza A (H3N2) but confidence intervals were wide and overlapping. Estimated VE was 59% (95% CI 26;77) in patients aged 45-64 years but only 8% (-78;53) in those aged 65 years and above. CONCLUSION: Prospective surveillance for SARI has been successfully established in NZ. This study for the first year, the 2012 influenza season, has shown low to moderate protection by TIV against influenza positive hospitalisation. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24768730/The_effectiveness_of_seasonal_trivalent_inactivated_influenza_vaccine_in_preventing_laboratory_confirmed_influenza_hospitalisations_in_Auckland_New_Zealand_in_2012_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(14)00515-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -