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Microsatellite testing in colon cancer
Oncol Nurs Forum 2014; 41(3):331-3ON

Abstract

Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular genetic basis of colorectal cancer (CRC). That information is paving the way to understanding the genetic basis of other tumors, as well. Oncology nurses should anticipate the routine integration of this information and testing of CRC tumors to understand the molecular basis of the disease in clinical practice. Molecular testing can lead to the identification of families at risk for hereditary cancer syndromes, particularly Lynch syndrome, which sometimes is referred to as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. Knowledge of the genetic basis of CRC also contributes valuable information aimed at selecting appropriate and effective targeted therapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine and in the School of Nursing, Saint Louis University in Missouri.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24769599

Citation

Mahon, Suzanne M.. "Microsatellite Testing in Colon Cancer." Oncology Nursing Forum, vol. 41, no. 3, 2014, pp. 331-3.
Mahon SM. Microsatellite testing in colon cancer. Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014;41(3):331-3.
Mahon, S. M. (2014). Microsatellite testing in colon cancer. Oncology Nursing Forum, 41(3), pp. 331-3. doi:10.1188/14.ONF.331-333.
Mahon SM. Microsatellite Testing in Colon Cancer. Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014;41(3):331-3. PubMed PMID: 24769599.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microsatellite testing in colon cancer A1 - Mahon,Suzanne M, PY - 2014/4/29/entrez PY - 2014/4/29/pubmed PY - 2014/12/23/medline KW - colorectal cancer KW - molecular pathways KW - molecular testing SP - 331 EP - 3 JF - Oncology nursing forum JO - Oncol Nurs Forum VL - 41 IS - 3 N2 - Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular genetic basis of colorectal cancer (CRC). That information is paving the way to understanding the genetic basis of other tumors, as well. Oncology nurses should anticipate the routine integration of this information and testing of CRC tumors to understand the molecular basis of the disease in clinical practice. Molecular testing can lead to the identification of families at risk for hereditary cancer syndromes, particularly Lynch syndrome, which sometimes is referred to as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. Knowledge of the genetic basis of CRC also contributes valuable information aimed at selecting appropriate and effective targeted therapy. SN - 1538-0688 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24769599/Microsatellite_testing_in_colon_cancer L2 - http://store.ons.org/article/find?doi=10.1188/14.ONF.331-333 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -