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Perceived discrimination and its associations with mental health and substance use among Asian American and Pacific Islander undergraduate and graduate students.
J Am Coll Health. 2014; 62(6):390-8.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Racial discrimination experiences can negatively affect health. This study examined perceived discrimination and its relationship with mental health and substance use among Asian American and Pacific Islander (API) undergraduate and graduate students.

PARTICIPANTS

A total of 113 API students aged 18-35 completed the study during February-June, 2011.

METHODS

The authors conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous survey online. Dependent variables included mental health (depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms) and substance use (alcohol problems, use of tobacco, marijuana or hashish, and other illegal drugs).

RESULTS

Students' perceived discrimination were significantly, positively associated with depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms, but not with substance use. Ethnic identity moderated the relationship between perceived discrimination and somatic symptoms, but not depressive or anxiety symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggested the negative effect of racial discrimination on API students' mental health. The buffering effect of ethnic identity may increase resilience in these students when they face racial discrimination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a College of Nursing and Health Innovation , Arizona State University , Phoenix Arizona.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24779453

Citation

Chen, Angela Chia-Chen, et al. "Perceived Discrimination and Its Associations With Mental Health and Substance Use Among Asian American and Pacific Islander Undergraduate and Graduate Students." Journal of American College Health : J of ACH, vol. 62, no. 6, 2014, pp. 390-8.
Chen AC, Szalacha LA, Menon U. Perceived discrimination and its associations with mental health and substance use among Asian American and Pacific Islander undergraduate and graduate students. J Am Coll Health. 2014;62(6):390-8.
Chen, A. C., Szalacha, L. A., & Menon, U. (2014). Perceived discrimination and its associations with mental health and substance use among Asian American and Pacific Islander undergraduate and graduate students. Journal of American College Health : J of ACH, 62(6), 390-8. https://doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2014.917648
Chen AC, Szalacha LA, Menon U. Perceived Discrimination and Its Associations With Mental Health and Substance Use Among Asian American and Pacific Islander Undergraduate and Graduate Students. J Am Coll Health. 2014;62(6):390-8. PubMed PMID: 24779453.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perceived discrimination and its associations with mental health and substance use among Asian American and Pacific Islander undergraduate and graduate students. AU - Chen,Angela Chia-Chen, AU - Szalacha,Laura A, AU - Menon,Usha, PY - 2014/5/1/entrez PY - 2014/5/2/pubmed PY - 2016/2/24/medline KW - API students KW - discrimination KW - ethnic identity KW - mental health KW - substance use SP - 390 EP - 8 JF - Journal of American college health : J of ACH JO - J Am Coll Health VL - 62 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Racial discrimination experiences can negatively affect health. This study examined perceived discrimination and its relationship with mental health and substance use among Asian American and Pacific Islander (API) undergraduate and graduate students. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 113 API students aged 18-35 completed the study during February-June, 2011. METHODS: The authors conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous survey online. Dependent variables included mental health (depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms) and substance use (alcohol problems, use of tobacco, marijuana or hashish, and other illegal drugs). RESULTS: Students' perceived discrimination were significantly, positively associated with depressive, anxiety, and somatic symptoms, but not with substance use. Ethnic identity moderated the relationship between perceived discrimination and somatic symptoms, but not depressive or anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggested the negative effect of racial discrimination on API students' mental health. The buffering effect of ethnic identity may increase resilience in these students when they face racial discrimination. SN - 1940-3208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24779453/Perceived_discrimination_and_its_associations_with_mental_health_and_substance_use_among_Asian_American_and_Pacific_Islander_undergraduate_and_graduate_students_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07448481.2014.917648 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -