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Insights about echinostomiasis by paleomolecular diagnosis.
Parasitol Int. 2014 Aug; 63(4):646-9.PI

Abstract

Echinostomiasis is a zoonosis caused by intestinal trematodes and transmitted by the ingestion of mollusks, crustaceans, fish, amphibians, and reptiles, either raw or poorly cooked. Today human infection is endemic in Southeast Asia and the Far East, but has been reported more recently in other regions of the world. Interestingly eggs identified as Echinostoma sp. were found in coprolites from a mummified body human in Brazil, dated 560 ± 40 BP (before present). However, the specific diagnosis based on morphology of the eggs has not been resolved at the species level. As a follow-up to the previous finding, the current study now aims to standardize the methodology for molecular diagnosis and apply it to the coprolite, using current Echinostoma paraensei-positive feces as the reference, and also the same fecal material dried in a stove as an experimental coprolite model. Isolated eggs of E. paraensei and adult worm were included to verify the sensibility and as positive control, respectively. An adult worm of E. luisreyi was used for comparison. PCR using primers in-house for ITS1 region (126 bp) and cox1 (123 bp) of Echinostoma spp. and subsequent nucleotide sequencing were performed. This is the first molecular paleoparasitological diagnosis for echinostomiasis. The methodology was able to amplify specific DNA fragments for the genus Echinostoma sp. in all samples: adult worm, feces, and a single egg of the parasite, in both the experimental coprolite and archaeological sample. Additionally we observed that ancient DNA can also be retrieved without rehydrating the material. The nucleotide sequences from E. paraensei and E. luisreyi are very similar in the fragment analyzed that difficult the differentiation these species, but DNA sequence analysis recovered in the parasite found in the mummy showed more similarity with the species E. paraensei.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Universidade Federal Fluminense, Instituto Biomédico, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Laboratório de Biologia Molecular de Parasitos, Rua Professor Hernani Melo 101, São Domingos, Niterói, RJ, CEP 24.210-130, Brazil. Electronic address: dleles@id.uff.br.Universidade Federal Fluminense, Instituto Biomédico, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Laboratório de Biologia Molecular de Parasitos, Rua Professor Hernani Melo 101, São Domingos, Niterói, RJ, CEP 24.210-130, Brazil.Universidade Federal Fluminense, Instituto Biomédico, Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Laboratório de Biologia Molecular de Parasitos, Rua Professor Hernani Melo 101, São Domingos, Niterói, RJ, CEP 24.210-130, Brazil.Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Laboratório de Biologia e Parasitologia de Mamíferos Silvestres Reservatórios, Av. Brasil, 4365, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21.045-900, Brazil.Laboratório de Paleoparasitologia, Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública-Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rua Leopoldo Bulhões 1480, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21.041-210, Brazil.Laboratório de Paleoparasitologia, Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública-Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rua Leopoldo Bulhões 1480, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21.041-210, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24780138

Citation

Leles, Daniela, et al. "Insights About Echinostomiasis By Paleomolecular Diagnosis." Parasitology International, vol. 63, no. 4, 2014, pp. 646-9.
Leles D, Cascardo P, Freire Ados S, et al. Insights about echinostomiasis by paleomolecular diagnosis. Parasitol Int. 2014;63(4):646-9.
Leles, D., Cascardo, P., Freire, A. d. o. s. . S., Maldonado, A., Sianto, L., & Araújo, A. (2014). Insights about echinostomiasis by paleomolecular diagnosis. Parasitology International, 63(4), 646-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2014.04.005
Leles D, et al. Insights About Echinostomiasis By Paleomolecular Diagnosis. Parasitol Int. 2014;63(4):646-9. PubMed PMID: 24780138.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Insights about echinostomiasis by paleomolecular diagnosis. AU - Leles,Daniela, AU - Cascardo,Paula, AU - Freire,Andressa Dos Santos, AU - Maldonado,Arnaldo,Jr AU - Sianto,Luciana, AU - Araújo,Adauto, Y1 - 2014/04/26/ PY - 2013/12/01/received PY - 2014/04/01/revised PY - 2014/04/17/accepted PY - 2014/5/1/entrez PY - 2014/5/2/pubmed PY - 2015/1/16/medline KW - Ancient DNA KW - Ancient parasites KW - Coprolite KW - Echinostoma KW - Mummy KW - Paleoparasitology SP - 646 EP - 9 JF - Parasitology international JO - Parasitol Int VL - 63 IS - 4 N2 - Echinostomiasis is a zoonosis caused by intestinal trematodes and transmitted by the ingestion of mollusks, crustaceans, fish, amphibians, and reptiles, either raw or poorly cooked. Today human infection is endemic in Southeast Asia and the Far East, but has been reported more recently in other regions of the world. Interestingly eggs identified as Echinostoma sp. were found in coprolites from a mummified body human in Brazil, dated 560 ± 40 BP (before present). However, the specific diagnosis based on morphology of the eggs has not been resolved at the species level. As a follow-up to the previous finding, the current study now aims to standardize the methodology for molecular diagnosis and apply it to the coprolite, using current Echinostoma paraensei-positive feces as the reference, and also the same fecal material dried in a stove as an experimental coprolite model. Isolated eggs of E. paraensei and adult worm were included to verify the sensibility and as positive control, respectively. An adult worm of E. luisreyi was used for comparison. PCR using primers in-house for ITS1 region (126 bp) and cox1 (123 bp) of Echinostoma spp. and subsequent nucleotide sequencing were performed. This is the first molecular paleoparasitological diagnosis for echinostomiasis. The methodology was able to amplify specific DNA fragments for the genus Echinostoma sp. in all samples: adult worm, feces, and a single egg of the parasite, in both the experimental coprolite and archaeological sample. Additionally we observed that ancient DNA can also be retrieved without rehydrating the material. The nucleotide sequences from E. paraensei and E. luisreyi are very similar in the fragment analyzed that difficult the differentiation these species, but DNA sequence analysis recovered in the parasite found in the mummy showed more similarity with the species E. paraensei. SN - 1873-0329 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24780138/Insights_about_echinostomiasis_by_paleomolecular_diagnosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1383-5769(14)00053-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -