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Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus quasispecies that include homologues of human isolates revealed through whole-genome analysis and virus cultured from dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia.
mBio. 2014 Apr 29; 5(3):e01146-14.MBIO

Abstract

ABSTRACT Complete Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) genome sequences were obtained from nasal swabs of dromedary camels sampled in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia through direct analysis of nucleic acid extracts or following virus isolation in cell culture. Consensus dromedary MERS-CoV genome sequences were the same with either template source and identical to published human MERS-CoV sequences. However, in contrast to individual human cases, where only clonal genomic sequences are reported, detailed population analyses revealed the presence of more than one genomic variant in individual dromedaries. If humans are truly infected only with clonal virus populations, we must entertain a model for interspecies transmission of MERS-CoV wherein only specific genotypes are capable of passing bottleneck selection. IMPORTANCE In most cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), the route for human infection with the causative agent, MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), is unknown. Antibodies to and viral nucleic acids of MERS-CoV have been found in dromedaries, suggesting the possibility that they may serve as a reservoir or vector for human infection. However, neither whole viral genomic sequence nor infectious virus has been isolated from dromedaries or other animals in Saudi Arabia. Here, we report recovery of MERS-CoV from nasal swabs of dromedaries, demonstrate that MERS-CoV whole-genome consensus sequences from dromedaries and humans are indistinguishable, and show that dromedaries can be simultaneously infected with more than one MERS-CoV. Together with data indicating widespread dromedary infection in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, these findings support the plausibility of a role for dromedaries in human infection.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24781747

Citation

Briese, Thomas, et al. "Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Quasispecies That Include Homologues of Human Isolates Revealed Through Whole-genome Analysis and Virus Cultured From Dromedary Camels in Saudi Arabia." MBio, vol. 5, no. 3, 2014, pp. e01146-14.
Briese T, Mishra N, Jain K, et al. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus quasispecies that include homologues of human isolates revealed through whole-genome analysis and virus cultured from dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia. mBio. 2014;5(3):e01146-14.
Briese, T., Mishra, N., Jain, K., Zalmout, I. S., Jabado, O. J., Karesh, W. B., Daszak, P., Mohammed, O. B., Alagaili, A. N., & Lipkin, W. I. (2014). Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus quasispecies that include homologues of human isolates revealed through whole-genome analysis and virus cultured from dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia. MBio, 5(3), e01146-14. https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01146-14
Briese T, et al. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Quasispecies That Include Homologues of Human Isolates Revealed Through Whole-genome Analysis and Virus Cultured From Dromedary Camels in Saudi Arabia. mBio. 2014 Apr 29;5(3):e01146-14. PubMed PMID: 24781747.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus quasispecies that include homologues of human isolates revealed through whole-genome analysis and virus cultured from dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia. AU - Briese,Thomas, AU - Mishra,Nischay, AU - Jain,Komal, AU - Zalmout,Iyad S, AU - Jabado,Omar J, AU - Karesh,William B, AU - Daszak,Peter, AU - Mohammed,Osama B, AU - Alagaili,Abdulaziz N, AU - Lipkin,W Ian, Y1 - 2014/04/29/ PY - 2014/5/1/entrez PY - 2014/5/2/pubmed PY - 2015/1/30/medline SP - e01146 EP - 14 JF - mBio JO - mBio VL - 5 IS - 3 N2 - ABSTRACT Complete Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) genome sequences were obtained from nasal swabs of dromedary camels sampled in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia through direct analysis of nucleic acid extracts or following virus isolation in cell culture. Consensus dromedary MERS-CoV genome sequences were the same with either template source and identical to published human MERS-CoV sequences. However, in contrast to individual human cases, where only clonal genomic sequences are reported, detailed population analyses revealed the presence of more than one genomic variant in individual dromedaries. If humans are truly infected only with clonal virus populations, we must entertain a model for interspecies transmission of MERS-CoV wherein only specific genotypes are capable of passing bottleneck selection. IMPORTANCE In most cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), the route for human infection with the causative agent, MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), is unknown. Antibodies to and viral nucleic acids of MERS-CoV have been found in dromedaries, suggesting the possibility that they may serve as a reservoir or vector for human infection. However, neither whole viral genomic sequence nor infectious virus has been isolated from dromedaries or other animals in Saudi Arabia. Here, we report recovery of MERS-CoV from nasal swabs of dromedaries, demonstrate that MERS-CoV whole-genome consensus sequences from dromedaries and humans are indistinguishable, and show that dromedaries can be simultaneously infected with more than one MERS-CoV. Together with data indicating widespread dromedary infection in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, these findings support the plausibility of a role for dromedaries in human infection. SN - 2150-7511 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24781747/Middle_East_respiratory_syndrome_coronavirus_quasispecies_that_include_homologues_of_human_isolates_revealed_through_whole_genome_analysis_and_virus_cultured_from_dromedary_camels_in_Saudi_Arabia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01146-14 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -