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Iodine content in commonly consumed food in Hong Kong and its changes due to cooking.

Abstract

Levels of iodine of foods found in Hong Kong were analysed in 271 samples from 11 groups, including (i) cereals and grain products, (ii) legumes and vegetables, (iii) meat and poultry, (iv) egg and egg products, (v) milk and milk products, (vi) fish, (vii) crustaceans and mollusks, (viii) non-alcoholic beverages, (ix) condiments and sauces, (x) sashimi and (xi) seaweeds. All food samples were analysed individually as purchased. The iodine in all samples ranged from undetectable to 2.9 g kg(-1). Seaweeds, iodised salt, seafood, milk and milk products as well as egg and egg products were rich sources of iodine. To estimate the influence of cooking on iodine levels in foods, a total of 15 individual samples were analysed as raw and respective cooked food. The influence of cooking on the iodine level was minimal, except for boiling, as iodine dissolved into the soup.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Centre for Food Safety, Food Research Laboratory , Kowloon , Hong Kong.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24786621

Citation

Chung, Stephen, et al. "Iodine Content in Commonly Consumed Food in Hong Kong and Its Changes Due to Cooking." Food Additives & Contaminants. Part B, Surveillance, vol. 6, no. 1, 2013, pp. 24-9.
Chung S, Chan A, Xiao Y, et al. Iodine content in commonly consumed food in Hong Kong and its changes due to cooking. Food Addit Contam Part B Surveill. 2013;6(1):24-9.
Chung, S., Chan, A., Xiao, Y., Lin, V., & Ho, Y. Y. (2013). Iodine content in commonly consumed food in Hong Kong and its changes due to cooking. Food Additives & Contaminants. Part B, Surveillance, 6(1), 24-9. https://doi.org/10.1080/19393210.2012.721011
Chung S, et al. Iodine Content in Commonly Consumed Food in Hong Kong and Its Changes Due to Cooking. Food Addit Contam Part B Surveill. 2013;6(1):24-9. PubMed PMID: 24786621.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iodine content in commonly consumed food in Hong Kong and its changes due to cooking. AU - Chung,Stephen, AU - Chan,Andy, AU - Xiao,Ying, AU - Lin,Violette, AU - Ho,Y Y, Y1 - 2012/09/17/ PY - 2014/5/3/entrez PY - 2013/3/1/pubmed PY - 2014/12/17/medline KW - Hong Kong KW - cooking KW - food KW - iodine SP - 24 EP - 9 JF - Food additives & contaminants. Part B, Surveillance JO - Food Addit Contam Part B Surveill VL - 6 IS - 1 N2 - Levels of iodine of foods found in Hong Kong were analysed in 271 samples from 11 groups, including (i) cereals and grain products, (ii) legumes and vegetables, (iii) meat and poultry, (iv) egg and egg products, (v) milk and milk products, (vi) fish, (vii) crustaceans and mollusks, (viii) non-alcoholic beverages, (ix) condiments and sauces, (x) sashimi and (xi) seaweeds. All food samples were analysed individually as purchased. The iodine in all samples ranged from undetectable to 2.9 g kg(-1). Seaweeds, iodised salt, seafood, milk and milk products as well as egg and egg products were rich sources of iodine. To estimate the influence of cooking on iodine levels in foods, a total of 15 individual samples were analysed as raw and respective cooked food. The influence of cooking on the iodine level was minimal, except for boiling, as iodine dissolved into the soup. SN - 1939-3229 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24786621/Iodine_content_in_commonly_consumed_food_in_Hong_Kong_and_its_changes_due_to_cooking_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19393210.2012.721011 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -