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Dose-response meta-analysis of poultry intake and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality.
Eur J Nutr 2015; 54(2):243-50EJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

Poultry intake has been inconsistently associated with incidence or mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC) in epidemiologic studies. The purpose of this study was to assess their relationships by performing a dose-response meta-analysis.

METHODS

We conducted a search of PubMed database between January 1966 and July 2013 for prospective studies that reported relative risks (RRs) with 95 % confidence interval (CIs) of CRC for at least three categories of poultry intake. Dose-response relationships were examined with the generalized least-squares trend estimation. Study-specific results were pooled with a random-effects model. Subgroup, sensitivity, and meta-regression analyses were also conducted to explore heterogeneity.

RESULTS

Sixteen studies on poultry intake and CRC incidence, and four studies regarding poultry intake and CRC mortality were identified. These studies involved a total of 13,949 incident CRC cases and 983 CRC deaths. The RRs of CRC for higher compared with lower intake of poultry were reported in these studies, and the reported levels of poultry intake varied substantially. Results of the dose-response meta-analysis conferred a RR of 0.89 (95 % CI 0.81-0.97) for an increase in poultry intake of 50 g/day. The results were not sensitive to any individual studies and were similar for colon and rectal cancer. Poultry intake was not associated with CRC mortality (RR for 50 g/day = 0.97, 95 % CI 0.79-1.20).

CONCLUSIONS

This meta-analysis indicates that poultry intake may be moderately associated with reduced incidence of CRC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Surgery and Center of Minimal Invasive Gastrointestinal Surgery, Southwest Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Gaotanyan Street 30#, Shapingba District, Chongqing, 400038, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24788671

Citation

Shi, Yan, et al. "Dose-response Meta-analysis of Poultry Intake and Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality." European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 54, no. 2, 2015, pp. 243-50.
Shi Y, Yu PW, Zeng DZ. Dose-response meta-analysis of poultry intake and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Eur J Nutr. 2015;54(2):243-50.
Shi, Y., Yu, P. W., & Zeng, D. Z. (2015). Dose-response meta-analysis of poultry intake and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. European Journal of Nutrition, 54(2), pp. 243-50. doi:10.1007/s00394-014-0705-0.
Shi Y, Yu PW, Zeng DZ. Dose-response Meta-analysis of Poultry Intake and Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality. Eur J Nutr. 2015;54(2):243-50. PubMed PMID: 24788671.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dose-response meta-analysis of poultry intake and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. AU - Shi,Yan, AU - Yu,Pei-Wu, AU - Zeng,Dong-Zhu, Y1 - 2014/05/01/ PY - 2013/12/16/received PY - 2014/04/16/accepted PY - 2014/5/3/entrez PY - 2014/5/3/pubmed PY - 2015/10/24/medline SP - 243 EP - 50 JF - European journal of nutrition JO - Eur J Nutr VL - 54 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: Poultry intake has been inconsistently associated with incidence or mortality of colorectal cancer (CRC) in epidemiologic studies. The purpose of this study was to assess their relationships by performing a dose-response meta-analysis. METHODS: We conducted a search of PubMed database between January 1966 and July 2013 for prospective studies that reported relative risks (RRs) with 95 % confidence interval (CIs) of CRC for at least three categories of poultry intake. Dose-response relationships were examined with the generalized least-squares trend estimation. Study-specific results were pooled with a random-effects model. Subgroup, sensitivity, and meta-regression analyses were also conducted to explore heterogeneity. RESULTS: Sixteen studies on poultry intake and CRC incidence, and four studies regarding poultry intake and CRC mortality were identified. These studies involved a total of 13,949 incident CRC cases and 983 CRC deaths. The RRs of CRC for higher compared with lower intake of poultry were reported in these studies, and the reported levels of poultry intake varied substantially. Results of the dose-response meta-analysis conferred a RR of 0.89 (95 % CI 0.81-0.97) for an increase in poultry intake of 50 g/day. The results were not sensitive to any individual studies and were similar for colon and rectal cancer. Poultry intake was not associated with CRC mortality (RR for 50 g/day = 0.97, 95 % CI 0.79-1.20). CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis indicates that poultry intake may be moderately associated with reduced incidence of CRC. SN - 1436-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24788671/Dose_response_meta_analysis_of_poultry_intake_and_colorectal_cancer_incidence_and_mortality_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-014-0705-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -