Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents from 2001 to 2009.
JAMA. 2014 May 07; 311(17):1778-86.JAMA

Abstract

IMPORTANCE

Despite concern about an "epidemic," there are limited data on trends in prevalence of either type 1 or type 2 diabetes across US race and ethnic groups.

OBJECTIVE

To estimate changes in the prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in US youth, by sex, age, and race/ethnicity between 2001 and 2009.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS

Case patients were ascertained in 4 geographic areas and 1 managed health care plan. The study population was determined by the 2001 and 2009 bridged-race intercensal population estimates for geographic sites and membership counts for the health plan.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES

Prevalence (per 1000) of physician-diagnosed type 1 diabetes in youth aged 0 through 19 years and type 2 diabetes in youth aged 10 through 19 years.

RESULTS

In 2001, 4958 of 3.3 million youth were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for a prevalence of 1.48 per 1000 (95% CI, 1.44-1.52). In 2009, 6666 of 3.4 million youth were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for a prevalence of 1.93 per 1000 (95% CI, 1.88-1.97). In 2009, the highest prevalence of type 1 diabetes was 2.55 per 1000 among white youth (95% CI, 2.48-2.62) and the lowest was 0.35 per 1000 in American Indian youth (95% CI, 0.26-0.47) and type 1 diabetes increased between 2001 and 2009 in all sex, age, and race/ethnic subgroups except for those with the lowest prevalence (age 0-4 years and American Indians). Adjusted for completeness of ascertainment, there was a 21.1% (95% CI, 15.6%-27.0%) increase in type 1 diabetes over 8 years. In 2001, 588 of 1.7 million youth were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for a prevalence of 0.34 per 1000 (95% CI, 0.31-0.37). In 2009, 819 of 1.8 million were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for a prevalence of 0.46 per 1000 (95% CI, 0.43-0.49). In 2009, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 1.20 per 1000 among American Indian youth (95% CI, 0.96-1.51); 1.06 per 1000 among black youth (95% CI, 0.93-1.22); 0.79 per 1000 among Hispanic youth (95% CI, 0.70-0.88); and 0.17 per 1000 among white youth (95% CI, 0.15-0.20). Significant increases occurred between 2001 and 2009 in both sexes, all age-groups, and in white, Hispanic, and black youth, with no significant changes for Asian Pacific Islanders and American Indians. Adjusted for completeness of ascertainment, there was a 30.5% (95% CI, 17.3%-45.1%) overall increase in type 2 diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE

Between 2001 and 2009 in 5 areas of the United States, the prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents increased. Further studies are required to determine the causes of these increases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora.Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Childhood Diabetes Research Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland.Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.Department of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, Washington.Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, Columbia, South Carolina.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, Columbia, South Carolina.Department of Research and Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Pasadena.Department of Research and Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Pasadena.Department of Endocrinology, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, and Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle.Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24794371

Citation

Dabelea, Dana, et al. "Prevalence of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Among Children and Adolescents From 2001 to 2009." JAMA, vol. 311, no. 17, 2014, pp. 1778-86.
Dabelea D, Mayer-Davis EJ, Saydah S, et al. Prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents from 2001 to 2009. JAMA. 2014;311(17):1778-86.
Dabelea, D., Mayer-Davis, E. J., Saydah, S., Imperatore, G., Linder, B., Divers, J., Bell, R., Badaru, A., Talton, J. W., Crume, T., Liese, A. D., Merchant, A. T., Lawrence, J. M., Reynolds, K., Dolan, L., Liu, L. L., & Hamman, R. F. (2014). Prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents from 2001 to 2009. JAMA, 311(17), 1778-86. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2014.3201
Dabelea D, et al. Prevalence of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Among Children and Adolescents From 2001 to 2009. JAMA. 2014 May 7;311(17):1778-86. PubMed PMID: 24794371.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents from 2001 to 2009. AU - Dabelea,Dana, AU - Mayer-Davis,Elizabeth J, AU - Saydah,Sharon, AU - Imperatore,Giuseppina, AU - Linder,Barbara, AU - Divers,Jasmin, AU - Bell,Ronny, AU - Badaru,Angela, AU - Talton,Jennifer W, AU - Crume,Tessa, AU - Liese,Angela D, AU - Merchant,Anwar T, AU - Lawrence,Jean M, AU - Reynolds,Kristi, AU - Dolan,Lawrence, AU - Liu,Lenna L, AU - Hamman,Richard F, AU - ,, PY - 2014/5/6/entrez PY - 2014/5/6/pubmed PY - 2014/5/17/medline SP - 1778 EP - 86 JF - JAMA JO - JAMA VL - 311 IS - 17 N2 - IMPORTANCE: Despite concern about an "epidemic," there are limited data on trends in prevalence of either type 1 or type 2 diabetes across US race and ethnic groups. OBJECTIVE: To estimate changes in the prevalence of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in US youth, by sex, age, and race/ethnicity between 2001 and 2009. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Case patients were ascertained in 4 geographic areas and 1 managed health care plan. The study population was determined by the 2001 and 2009 bridged-race intercensal population estimates for geographic sites and membership counts for the health plan. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Prevalence (per 1000) of physician-diagnosed type 1 diabetes in youth aged 0 through 19 years and type 2 diabetes in youth aged 10 through 19 years. RESULTS: In 2001, 4958 of 3.3 million youth were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for a prevalence of 1.48 per 1000 (95% CI, 1.44-1.52). In 2009, 6666 of 3.4 million youth were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for a prevalence of 1.93 per 1000 (95% CI, 1.88-1.97). In 2009, the highest prevalence of type 1 diabetes was 2.55 per 1000 among white youth (95% CI, 2.48-2.62) and the lowest was 0.35 per 1000 in American Indian youth (95% CI, 0.26-0.47) and type 1 diabetes increased between 2001 and 2009 in all sex, age, and race/ethnic subgroups except for those with the lowest prevalence (age 0-4 years and American Indians). Adjusted for completeness of ascertainment, there was a 21.1% (95% CI, 15.6%-27.0%) increase in type 1 diabetes over 8 years. In 2001, 588 of 1.7 million youth were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for a prevalence of 0.34 per 1000 (95% CI, 0.31-0.37). In 2009, 819 of 1.8 million were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for a prevalence of 0.46 per 1000 (95% CI, 0.43-0.49). In 2009, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 1.20 per 1000 among American Indian youth (95% CI, 0.96-1.51); 1.06 per 1000 among black youth (95% CI, 0.93-1.22); 0.79 per 1000 among Hispanic youth (95% CI, 0.70-0.88); and 0.17 per 1000 among white youth (95% CI, 0.15-0.20). Significant increases occurred between 2001 and 2009 in both sexes, all age-groups, and in white, Hispanic, and black youth, with no significant changes for Asian Pacific Islanders and American Indians. Adjusted for completeness of ascertainment, there was a 30.5% (95% CI, 17.3%-45.1%) overall increase in type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Between 2001 and 2009 in 5 areas of the United States, the prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents increased. Further studies are required to determine the causes of these increases. SN - 1538-3598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24794371/Prevalence_of_type_1_and_type_2_diabetes_among_children_and_adolescents_from_2001_to_2009_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/10.1001/jama.2014.3201 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -