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Weight loss strategies: association with consumption of sugary beverages, snacks and values about food purchases.
Patient Educ Couns. 2014 Jul; 96(1):128-34.PE

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine whether weight loss strategies are associated with consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), snacks or food values.

METHODS

Cross-sectional analysis of 24-h dietary recall data obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010 (N=9440).

RESULTS

Adults trying to lose weight consumed roughly 2000 total calories, 250 calories from SSBs, 225 calories from salty snacks, and 350 calories from sweet snacks. Adults not trying to lose weight consumed roughly 2300 total calories, 300 calories from SSBs, 250 calories from salty snacks, and 380 calories from sweet snacks. While overweight and obese adults trying to lose weight consumed fewer calories than those who were not, heavier adults trying to lose weight using dietary strategies or a combination of diet and physical activity consumed more calories than healthy weight adults using that same weight loss strategy (p<0.05). Price (>70%) and nutrition (>50%) were most when making food choices (p<0.05) for all groups.

CONCLUSION

Consumption of discretionary calories is high regardless of body weight or weight loss intention.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS

Promoting reduced SSB and snack consumption in the clinical setting may be important for weight loss, particularly among heavier individuals. Clinicians should consider values related to food purchasing to identify concrete behavioral targets.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA. Electronic address: sbleich@jhsph.edu.Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24801411

Citation

Bleich, Sara N., and Julia A. Wolfson. "Weight Loss Strategies: Association With Consumption of Sugary Beverages, Snacks and Values About Food Purchases." Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 96, no. 1, 2014, pp. 128-34.
Bleich SN, Wolfson JA. Weight loss strategies: association with consumption of sugary beverages, snacks and values about food purchases. Patient Educ Couns. 2014;96(1):128-34.
Bleich, S. N., & Wolfson, J. A. (2014). Weight loss strategies: association with consumption of sugary beverages, snacks and values about food purchases. Patient Education and Counseling, 96(1), 128-34. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2014.04.008
Bleich SN, Wolfson JA. Weight Loss Strategies: Association With Consumption of Sugary Beverages, Snacks and Values About Food Purchases. Patient Educ Couns. 2014;96(1):128-34. PubMed PMID: 24801411.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Weight loss strategies: association with consumption of sugary beverages, snacks and values about food purchases. AU - Bleich,Sara N, AU - Wolfson,Julia A, Y1 - 2014/04/26/ PY - 2013/12/23/received PY - 2014/03/25/revised PY - 2014/04/10/accepted PY - 2014/5/8/entrez PY - 2014/5/8/pubmed PY - 2016/3/12/medline KW - Body weight KW - Dietary patterns KW - Food values KW - Weight loss intention KW - Weight loss strategies SP - 128 EP - 34 JF - Patient education and counseling JO - Patient Educ Couns VL - 96 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine whether weight loss strategies are associated with consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), snacks or food values. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of 24-h dietary recall data obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010 (N=9440). RESULTS: Adults trying to lose weight consumed roughly 2000 total calories, 250 calories from SSBs, 225 calories from salty snacks, and 350 calories from sweet snacks. Adults not trying to lose weight consumed roughly 2300 total calories, 300 calories from SSBs, 250 calories from salty snacks, and 380 calories from sweet snacks. While overweight and obese adults trying to lose weight consumed fewer calories than those who were not, heavier adults trying to lose weight using dietary strategies or a combination of diet and physical activity consumed more calories than healthy weight adults using that same weight loss strategy (p<0.05). Price (>70%) and nutrition (>50%) were most when making food choices (p<0.05) for all groups. CONCLUSION: Consumption of discretionary calories is high regardless of body weight or weight loss intention. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Promoting reduced SSB and snack consumption in the clinical setting may be important for weight loss, particularly among heavier individuals. Clinicians should consider values related to food purchasing to identify concrete behavioral targets. SN - 1873-5134 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24801411/Weight_loss_strategies:_association_with_consumption_of_sugary_beverages_snacks_and_values_about_food_purchases_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738-3991(14)00146-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -