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Fruits and vegetables consumption and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.
Stroke 2014; 45(6):1613-9S

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize evidence from prospective cohort studies about the association of fruits and vegetables consumption with the risk of stroke.

METHODS

Pertinent studies were identified by a search of Embase and PubMed databases to January 2014. Study-specific relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were pooled using a random-effects model. Dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline.

RESULTS

Twenty prospective cohort studies were included, involving 16 981 stroke events among 760 629 participants. The multivariable relative risk (95% confidence intervals) of stroke for the highest versus lowest category of total fruits and vegetables consumption was 0.79 (0.75-0.84), and the effect was 0.77 (0.71-0.84) for fruits consumption and 0.86 (0.79-0.93) for vegetables consumption. Subgroup and meta-regression showed that the inverse association of total fruits and vegetables consumption with the risk of stroke was consistent in subgroup analysis. Citrus fruits, apples/pears, and leafy vegetables might contribute to the protection. The linear dose-response relationship showed that the risk of stroke decreased by 32% (0.68 [0.56-0.82]) and 11% (0.89 [0.81-0.98]) for every 200 g per day increment in fruits consumption (P for nonlinearity=0.77) and vegetables consumption (P for nonlinearity=0.62), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Fruits and vegetables consumption are inversely associated with the risk of stroke.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Intensive Care Unit, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, China (D.H., J.H., Y.Q.); Intensive Care Unit, Hiser Medical Center, Qingdao, China (Y.W.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Medical College of Qingdao University, Qingdao, China (D.Z.).From the Intensive Care Unit, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, China (D.H., J.H., Y.Q.); Intensive Care Unit, Hiser Medical Center, Qingdao, China (Y.W.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Medical College of Qingdao University, Qingdao, China (D.Z.).From the Intensive Care Unit, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, China (D.H., J.H., Y.Q.); Intensive Care Unit, Hiser Medical Center, Qingdao, China (Y.W.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Medical College of Qingdao University, Qingdao, China (D.Z.).From the Intensive Care Unit, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, China (D.H., J.H., Y.Q.); Intensive Care Unit, Hiser Medical Center, Qingdao, China (Y.W.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Medical College of Qingdao University, Qingdao, China (D.Z.).From the Intensive Care Unit, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, China (D.H., J.H., Y.Q.); Intensive Care Unit, Hiser Medical Center, Qingdao, China (Y.W.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Medical College of Qingdao University, Qingdao, China (D.Z.). Quyan1963qd@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24811336

Citation

Hu, Dan, et al. "Fruits and Vegetables Consumption and Risk of Stroke: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies." Stroke, vol. 45, no. 6, 2014, pp. 1613-9.
Hu D, Huang J, Wang Y, et al. Fruits and vegetables consumption and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Stroke. 2014;45(6):1613-9.
Hu, D., Huang, J., Wang, Y., Zhang, D., & Qu, Y. (2014). Fruits and vegetables consumption and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Stroke, 45(6), pp. 1613-9. doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.004836.
Hu D, et al. Fruits and Vegetables Consumption and Risk of Stroke: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Stroke. 2014;45(6):1613-9. PubMed PMID: 24811336.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fruits and vegetables consumption and risk of stroke: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. AU - Hu,Dan, AU - Huang,Junqian, AU - Wang,Yuchun, AU - Zhang,Dongfeng, AU - Qu,Yan, Y1 - 2014/05/08/ PY - 2014/5/10/entrez PY - 2014/5/9/pubmed PY - 2014/8/19/medline KW - fruit KW - meta-analysis KW - stroke KW - vegetables SP - 1613 EP - 9 JF - Stroke JO - Stroke VL - 45 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize evidence from prospective cohort studies about the association of fruits and vegetables consumption with the risk of stroke. METHODS: Pertinent studies were identified by a search of Embase and PubMed databases to January 2014. Study-specific relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were pooled using a random-effects model. Dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline. RESULTS: Twenty prospective cohort studies were included, involving 16 981 stroke events among 760 629 participants. The multivariable relative risk (95% confidence intervals) of stroke for the highest versus lowest category of total fruits and vegetables consumption was 0.79 (0.75-0.84), and the effect was 0.77 (0.71-0.84) for fruits consumption and 0.86 (0.79-0.93) for vegetables consumption. Subgroup and meta-regression showed that the inverse association of total fruits and vegetables consumption with the risk of stroke was consistent in subgroup analysis. Citrus fruits, apples/pears, and leafy vegetables might contribute to the protection. The linear dose-response relationship showed that the risk of stroke decreased by 32% (0.68 [0.56-0.82]) and 11% (0.89 [0.81-0.98]) for every 200 g per day increment in fruits consumption (P for nonlinearity=0.77) and vegetables consumption (P for nonlinearity=0.62), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Fruits and vegetables consumption are inversely associated with the risk of stroke. SN - 1524-4628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24811336/full_citation L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.004836?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -