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Insect antimicrobial peptides and their applications.
Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2014; 98(13):5807-22AM

Abstract

Insects are one of the major sources of antimicrobial peptides/proteins (AMPs). Since observation of antimicrobial activity in the hemolymph of pupae from the giant silk moths Samia Cynthia and Hyalophora cecropia in 1974 and purification of first insect AMP (cecropin) from H. cecropia pupae in 1980, over 150 insect AMPs have been purified or identified. Most insect AMPs are small and cationic, and they show activities against bacteria and/or fungi, as well as some parasites and viruses. Insect AMPs can be classified into four families based on their structures or unique sequences: the α-helical peptides (cecropin and moricin), cysteine-rich peptides (insect defensin and drosomycin), proline-rich peptides (apidaecin, drosocin, and lebocin), and glycine-rich peptides/proteins (attacin and gloverin). Among insect AMPs, defensins, cecropins, proline-rich peptides, and attacins are common, while gloverins and moricins have been identified only in Lepidoptera. Most active AMPs are small peptides of 20-50 residues, which are generated from larger inactive precursor proteins or pro-proteins, but gloverins (~14 kDa) and attacins (~20 kDa) are large antimicrobial proteins. In this mini-review, we will discuss current knowledge and recent progress in several classes of insect AMPs, including insect defensins, cecropins, attacins, lebocins and other proline-rich peptides, gloverins, and moricins, with a focus on structural-functional relationships and their potential applications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24811407

Citation

Yi, Hui-Yu, et al. "Insect Antimicrobial Peptides and Their Applications." Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, vol. 98, no. 13, 2014, pp. 5807-22.
Yi HY, Chowdhury M, Huang YD, et al. Insect antimicrobial peptides and their applications. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2014;98(13):5807-22.
Yi, H. Y., Chowdhury, M., Huang, Y. D., & Yu, X. Q. (2014). Insect antimicrobial peptides and their applications. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 98(13), pp. 5807-22. doi:10.1007/s00253-014-5792-6.
Yi HY, et al. Insect Antimicrobial Peptides and Their Applications. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2014;98(13):5807-22. PubMed PMID: 24811407.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Insect antimicrobial peptides and their applications. AU - Yi,Hui-Yu, AU - Chowdhury,Munmun, AU - Huang,Ya-Dong, AU - Yu,Xiao-Qiang, Y1 - 2014/05/09/ PY - 2014/02/06/received PY - 2014/04/23/accepted PY - 2014/04/21/revised PY - 2014/5/10/entrez PY - 2014/5/9/pubmed PY - 2015/8/19/medline SP - 5807 EP - 22 JF - Applied microbiology and biotechnology JO - Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. VL - 98 IS - 13 N2 - Insects are one of the major sources of antimicrobial peptides/proteins (AMPs). Since observation of antimicrobial activity in the hemolymph of pupae from the giant silk moths Samia Cynthia and Hyalophora cecropia in 1974 and purification of first insect AMP (cecropin) from H. cecropia pupae in 1980, over 150 insect AMPs have been purified or identified. Most insect AMPs are small and cationic, and they show activities against bacteria and/or fungi, as well as some parasites and viruses. Insect AMPs can be classified into four families based on their structures or unique sequences: the α-helical peptides (cecropin and moricin), cysteine-rich peptides (insect defensin and drosomycin), proline-rich peptides (apidaecin, drosocin, and lebocin), and glycine-rich peptides/proteins (attacin and gloverin). Among insect AMPs, defensins, cecropins, proline-rich peptides, and attacins are common, while gloverins and moricins have been identified only in Lepidoptera. Most active AMPs are small peptides of 20-50 residues, which are generated from larger inactive precursor proteins or pro-proteins, but gloverins (~14 kDa) and attacins (~20 kDa) are large antimicrobial proteins. In this mini-review, we will discuss current knowledge and recent progress in several classes of insect AMPs, including insect defensins, cecropins, attacins, lebocins and other proline-rich peptides, gloverins, and moricins, with a focus on structural-functional relationships and their potential applications. SN - 1432-0614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24811407/Insect_antimicrobial_peptides_and_their_applications_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-014-5792-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -