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Malaria prevention in the pregnant traveller: a review.
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2014 May-Jun; 12(3):229-36.TM

Abstract

Malaria is still a major threat to health in tropical regions. Particular attention should be directed to malaria prevention in infants and pregnant women as they are at high risk for plasmodial infection and complicated malaria. In this review, we summarize and discuss current evidence on malaria prevention in pregnant travellers. As neither anti-mosquito measures nor anti-malarial drugs have been proven to be unequivocally safe or toxic in pregnant women, the individual risk assessment should take into account the risk of transmission at the destination, the benefit of travelling despite being pregnant as well as the individual risk perception. All three factors may differ in various groups of travellers like tourist travellers, expatriate travellers as well as those visiting friends and relatives. For pregnant women, mefloquine appears to be the drug of choice for prophylaxis and stand by-therapy if no contraindications exist - despite recent renewed warnings related to prolonged side effects. In areas with high resistance against mefloquine or in women with contraindications to mefloquine, atovaquone-proguanil or artemether-lumefantrine should be considered as an option for stand-by emergency therapy. Nevertheless, evidence on the safety of anti-malarials especially during the first trimester is still insufficient.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases, I. Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany; Clinical Research, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany.Section Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases, I. Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany; Clinical Research, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: cramer@bni-hamburg.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24813714

Citation

Roggelin, Louise, and Jakob P. Cramer. "Malaria Prevention in the Pregnant Traveller: a Review." Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, vol. 12, no. 3, 2014, pp. 229-36.
Roggelin L, Cramer JP. Malaria prevention in the pregnant traveller: a review. Travel Med Infect Dis. 2014;12(3):229-36.
Roggelin, L., & Cramer, J. P. (2014). Malaria prevention in the pregnant traveller: a review. Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, 12(3), 229-36. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tmaid.2014.04.007
Roggelin L, Cramer JP. Malaria Prevention in the Pregnant Traveller: a Review. Travel Med Infect Dis. 2014;12(3):229-36. PubMed PMID: 24813714.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Malaria prevention in the pregnant traveller: a review. AU - Roggelin,Louise, AU - Cramer,Jakob P, Y1 - 2014/05/06/ PY - 2013/08/23/received PY - 2014/04/15/revised PY - 2014/04/24/accepted PY - 2014/5/13/entrez PY - 2014/5/13/pubmed PY - 2015/4/17/medline KW - Malaria prophylaxis KW - Pregnancy KW - Pregnant traveller KW - Stand-by emergency therapy KW - Trimester SP - 229 EP - 36 JF - Travel medicine and infectious disease JO - Travel Med Infect Dis VL - 12 IS - 3 N2 - Malaria is still a major threat to health in tropical regions. Particular attention should be directed to malaria prevention in infants and pregnant women as they are at high risk for plasmodial infection and complicated malaria. In this review, we summarize and discuss current evidence on malaria prevention in pregnant travellers. As neither anti-mosquito measures nor anti-malarial drugs have been proven to be unequivocally safe or toxic in pregnant women, the individual risk assessment should take into account the risk of transmission at the destination, the benefit of travelling despite being pregnant as well as the individual risk perception. All three factors may differ in various groups of travellers like tourist travellers, expatriate travellers as well as those visiting friends and relatives. For pregnant women, mefloquine appears to be the drug of choice for prophylaxis and stand by-therapy if no contraindications exist - despite recent renewed warnings related to prolonged side effects. In areas with high resistance against mefloquine or in women with contraindications to mefloquine, atovaquone-proguanil or artemether-lumefantrine should be considered as an option for stand-by emergency therapy. Nevertheless, evidence on the safety of anti-malarials especially during the first trimester is still insufficient. SN - 1873-0442 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24813714/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1477-8939(14)00081-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -