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Management of hyperphosphataemia: practices and perspectives amongst the renal care community.
J Ren Care. 2014 Dec; 40(4):230-8.JR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Protein-rich foods are a major source of dietary phosphorus; therefore, helping patients to increase their dietary protein intake, while simultaneously managing their hyperphosphataemia, poses a significant challenge for renal care professionals.

OBJECTIVES

To examine the clinical recommendations and practice perceptions of renal care professionals providing nutrition and phosphate control advice to patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

METHODS

Renal care professionals from four European countries completed an online survey on the clinical management of hyperphosphataemia.

RESULTS

The majority of responders recommended a protein intake of less than 1.0 g/kg/day for pre-dialysis patients, 1.2 g/kg/day for patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) and 1.1-1.2 g/kg/day for patients undergoing haemodialysis (HD). The most common perception was that maintaining dietary protein intake and reducing dietary phosphorus intake are equally important for hyperphosphataemia management. For patients in the pre-dialysis stage, the majority of responders (59%) reported that their first-line management recommendation would be reduction of dietary phosphorus. For patients undergoing PD and HD, the majority of responders (53% and 59%, respectively) reported a first-line management recommendation of both reduction of dietary phosphorus and phosphate binder therapy. More renal nurses than dietitians perceived reducing dietary phosphorus to be more important than maintaining protein intake (for patients undergoing PD, 23% vs. 0%, respectively; for patients undergoing HD, 34% vs. 0%, respectively).

CONCLUSION

This renal care community followed professionally accepted guidelines for patient nutrition and management of hyperphosphataemia. There was disparity in the perceptions and recommendations between nurses and dietitians, highlighting the need to standardise management practices amongst renal care professionals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dialyse Centrum Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24814866

Citation

Nagel, Christina Johanna Maria, et al. "Management of Hyperphosphataemia: Practices and Perspectives Amongst the Renal Care Community." Journal of Renal Care, vol. 40, no. 4, 2014, pp. 230-8.
Nagel CJ, Casal MC, Lindley E, et al. Management of hyperphosphataemia: practices and perspectives amongst the renal care community. J Ren Care. 2014;40(4):230-8.
Nagel, C. J., Casal, M. C., Lindley, E., Rogers, S., Pancířová, J., Kernc, J., Copley, J. B., & Fouque, D. (2014). Management of hyperphosphataemia: practices and perspectives amongst the renal care community. Journal of Renal Care, 40(4), 230-8. https://doi.org/10.1111/jorc.12072
Nagel CJ, et al. Management of Hyperphosphataemia: Practices and Perspectives Amongst the Renal Care Community. J Ren Care. 2014;40(4):230-8. PubMed PMID: 24814866.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Management of hyperphosphataemia: practices and perspectives amongst the renal care community. AU - Nagel,Christina Johanna Maria, AU - Casal,María Cruz, AU - Lindley,Elizabeth, AU - Rogers,Susan, AU - Pancířová,Jitka, AU - Kernc,Jennifer, AU - Copley,J Brian, AU - Fouque,Denis, Y1 - 2014/05/11/ PY - 2014/5/13/entrez PY - 2014/5/13/pubmed PY - 2016/10/13/medline KW - Chronic kidney disease KW - Haemodialysis KW - Nursing KW - Nutrition/malnutrition KW - Peritoneal dialysis SP - 230 EP - 8 JF - Journal of renal care JO - J Ren Care VL - 40 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Protein-rich foods are a major source of dietary phosphorus; therefore, helping patients to increase their dietary protein intake, while simultaneously managing their hyperphosphataemia, poses a significant challenge for renal care professionals. OBJECTIVES: To examine the clinical recommendations and practice perceptions of renal care professionals providing nutrition and phosphate control advice to patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). METHODS: Renal care professionals from four European countries completed an online survey on the clinical management of hyperphosphataemia. RESULTS: The majority of responders recommended a protein intake of less than 1.0 g/kg/day for pre-dialysis patients, 1.2 g/kg/day for patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) and 1.1-1.2 g/kg/day for patients undergoing haemodialysis (HD). The most common perception was that maintaining dietary protein intake and reducing dietary phosphorus intake are equally important for hyperphosphataemia management. For patients in the pre-dialysis stage, the majority of responders (59%) reported that their first-line management recommendation would be reduction of dietary phosphorus. For patients undergoing PD and HD, the majority of responders (53% and 59%, respectively) reported a first-line management recommendation of both reduction of dietary phosphorus and phosphate binder therapy. More renal nurses than dietitians perceived reducing dietary phosphorus to be more important than maintaining protein intake (for patients undergoing PD, 23% vs. 0%, respectively; for patients undergoing HD, 34% vs. 0%, respectively). CONCLUSION: This renal care community followed professionally accepted guidelines for patient nutrition and management of hyperphosphataemia. There was disparity in the perceptions and recommendations between nurses and dietitians, highlighting the need to standardise management practices amongst renal care professionals. SN - 1755-6686 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24814866/Management_of_hyperphosphataemia:_practices_and_perspectives_amongst_the_renal_care_community_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jorc.12072 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -