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Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) among UK military personnel whilst deployed in Afghanistan in 2011.
Brain Inj. 2014; 28(7):896-9.BI

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

mTBI has been termed the 'signature injury' of recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Most mTBI research uses retrospective accounts of exposure and point of injury symptoms; mTBI is reportedly less common among UK than US Forces.

METHODS

This study examined the rate of mTBI exposure and symptoms in 1363 UK military personnel deployed in Afghanistan in 2011 using a self-report questionnaire. Data were collected in the operational location during the 5th month of a 6-month deployment. Personnel reported injuries and symptoms related to six events including fragmentation, blast, bullet, fall, motor vehicle accident and 'other' exposure.

RESULTS

Eighty (5.9%) reported at least one potential mTBI exposure during the current deployment and 1.6% (n = 22) reported injury and one or more mTBI symptoms (1 year incidence rate = 3.2%). Higher PTSD symptom scores were significantly associated with reporting potential mTBI (p ≤ 0.001) and mTBI with symptoms (p ≤ 0.001).

CONCLUSION

This study used contemporaneous data gathered in the deployed location which are subject to less memory distortion than studies using post-deployment recall. The incidence of mTBI was substantially lower than those reported in both US and UK post-deployment studies which is consistent with inflated reporting of symptoms when measured post-deployment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

King's Centre for Military Health and Academic Centre for Defence Mental Health, Academic Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Weston Education Centre , London , UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24826954

Citation

Jones, Norman, et al. "Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) Among UK Military Personnel Whilst Deployed in Afghanistan in 2011." Brain Injury, vol. 28, no. 7, 2014, pp. 896-9.
Jones N, Fear NT, Rona R, et al. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) among UK military personnel whilst deployed in Afghanistan in 2011. Brain Inj. 2014;28(7):896-9.
Jones, N., Fear, N. T., Rona, R., Fertout, M., Thandi, G., Wessely, S., & Greenberg, N. (2014). Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) among UK military personnel whilst deployed in Afghanistan in 2011. Brain Injury, 28(7), 896-9. https://doi.org/10.3109/02699052.2014.888479
Jones N, et al. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) Among UK Military Personnel Whilst Deployed in Afghanistan in 2011. Brain Inj. 2014;28(7):896-9. PubMed PMID: 24826954.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) among UK military personnel whilst deployed in Afghanistan in 2011. AU - Jones,Norman, AU - Fear,Nicola T, AU - Rona,Roberto, AU - Fertout,Mohammed, AU - Thandi,Gursimran, AU - Wessely,Simon, AU - Greenberg,Neil, PY - 2014/5/16/entrez PY - 2014/5/16/pubmed PY - 2015/2/3/medline KW - Concussion KW - cultural KW - evaluation KW - head injury KW - mild brain injury KW - neuropsychiatric SP - 896 EP - 9 JF - Brain injury JO - Brain Inj VL - 28 IS - 7 N2 - INTRODUCTION: mTBI has been termed the 'signature injury' of recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Most mTBI research uses retrospective accounts of exposure and point of injury symptoms; mTBI is reportedly less common among UK than US Forces. METHODS: This study examined the rate of mTBI exposure and symptoms in 1363 UK military personnel deployed in Afghanistan in 2011 using a self-report questionnaire. Data were collected in the operational location during the 5th month of a 6-month deployment. Personnel reported injuries and symptoms related to six events including fragmentation, blast, bullet, fall, motor vehicle accident and 'other' exposure. RESULTS: Eighty (5.9%) reported at least one potential mTBI exposure during the current deployment and 1.6% (n = 22) reported injury and one or more mTBI symptoms (1 year incidence rate = 3.2%). Higher PTSD symptom scores were significantly associated with reporting potential mTBI (p ≤ 0.001) and mTBI with symptoms (p ≤ 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study used contemporaneous data gathered in the deployed location which are subject to less memory distortion than studies using post-deployment recall. The incidence of mTBI was substantially lower than those reported in both US and UK post-deployment studies which is consistent with inflated reporting of symptoms when measured post-deployment. SN - 1362-301X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24826954/Mild_traumatic_brain_injury__mTBI__among_UK_military_personnel_whilst_deployed_in_Afghanistan_in_2011_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/02699052.2014.888479 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -