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Consumption of green tea, but not black tea or coffee, is associated with reduced risk of cognitive decline.

Abstract

Our objective was to determine whether the consumption of green tea, coffee, or black tea influences the incidence of dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older people. We conducted a population-based prospective study with Japanese residents aged >60 years from Nakajima, Japan (the Nakajima Project). Participants received an evaluation of cognitive function and blood tests. The consumption of green tea, coffee, and black tea was also evaluated at baseline. Of 723 participants with normal cognitive function at a baseline survey (2007-2008), 490 completed the follow up survey in 2011-2013. The incidence of dementia during the follow-up period (mean ± SD: 4.9 ± 0.9 years) was 5.3%, and that of MCI was 13.1%. The multiple-adjusted odds ratio for the incidence of overall cognitive decline (dementia or MCI) was 0.32 (95% CI: 0.16-0.64) among individuals who consumed green tea every day and 0.47 (95% CI: 0.25-0.86) among those who consumed green tea 1-6 days per week compared with individuals who did not consume green tea at all. The multiple-adjusted odds ratio for the incidence of dementia was 0.26 (95% CI: 0.06-1.06) among individuals who consumed green tea every day compared with those who did not consume green tea at all. No association was found between coffee or black tea consumption and the incidence of dementia or MCI. Our results indicate that green tea consumption is significantly associated with reduced risk of cognitive decline, even after adjustment for possible confounding factors.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Neurology and Neurobiology of Aging, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Japan.

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    Department of Neurology and Neurobiology of Aging, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Japan.

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    Department of Neurology and Neurobiology of Aging, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Japan.

    ,

    Department of Neurology and Neurobiology of Aging, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Japan.

    ,

    Department of Neurology and Neurobiology of Aging, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Japan.

    ,

    Department of Neurology and Neurobiology of Aging, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Japan.

    ,

    Department of Physical Therapy, Division of Health Sciences, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Japan.

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    Bishoen Geriatric Health Services Facility, Suzu, Japan.

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    Department of Neurology, Ioh Hospital, National Hospital Organization, Kanazawa, Japan.

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    Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Japan.

    Department of Neurology and Neurobiology of Aging, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Japan.

    Source

    PloS one 9:5 2014 pg e96013

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Coffee
    Cognitive Dysfunction
    Dementia
    Drinking
    Female
    Health Surveys
    Humans
    Incidence
    Japan
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Risk
    Tea

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24828424

    Citation

    Noguchi-Shinohara, Moeko, et al. "Consumption of Green Tea, but Not Black Tea or Coffee, Is Associated With Reduced Risk of Cognitive Decline." PloS One, vol. 9, no. 5, 2014, pp. e96013.
    Noguchi-Shinohara M, Yuki S, Dohmoto C, et al. Consumption of green tea, but not black tea or coffee, is associated with reduced risk of cognitive decline. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(5):e96013.
    Noguchi-Shinohara, M., Yuki, S., Dohmoto, C., Ikeda, Y., Samuraki, M., Iwasa, K., ... Yamada, M. (2014). Consumption of green tea, but not black tea or coffee, is associated with reduced risk of cognitive decline. PloS One, 9(5), pp. e96013. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0096013.
    Noguchi-Shinohara M, et al. Consumption of Green Tea, but Not Black Tea or Coffee, Is Associated With Reduced Risk of Cognitive Decline. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(5):e96013. PubMed PMID: 24828424.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of green tea, but not black tea or coffee, is associated with reduced risk of cognitive decline. AU - Noguchi-Shinohara,Moeko, AU - Yuki,Sohshi, AU - Dohmoto,Chiaki, AU - Ikeda,Yoshihisa, AU - Samuraki,Miharu, AU - Iwasa,Kazuo, AU - Yokogawa,Masami, AU - Asai,Kimiko, AU - Komai,Kiyonobu, AU - Nakamura,Hiroyuki, AU - Yamada,Masahito, Y1 - 2014/05/14/ PY - 2014/02/20/received PY - 2014/04/02/accepted PY - 2014/5/16/entrez PY - 2014/5/16/pubmed PY - 2014/12/31/medline SP - e96013 EP - e96013 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 9 IS - 5 N2 - Our objective was to determine whether the consumption of green tea, coffee, or black tea influences the incidence of dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older people. We conducted a population-based prospective study with Japanese residents aged >60 years from Nakajima, Japan (the Nakajima Project). Participants received an evaluation of cognitive function and blood tests. The consumption of green tea, coffee, and black tea was also evaluated at baseline. Of 723 participants with normal cognitive function at a baseline survey (2007-2008), 490 completed the follow up survey in 2011-2013. The incidence of dementia during the follow-up period (mean ± SD: 4.9 ± 0.9 years) was 5.3%, and that of MCI was 13.1%. The multiple-adjusted odds ratio for the incidence of overall cognitive decline (dementia or MCI) was 0.32 (95% CI: 0.16-0.64) among individuals who consumed green tea every day and 0.47 (95% CI: 0.25-0.86) among those who consumed green tea 1-6 days per week compared with individuals who did not consume green tea at all. The multiple-adjusted odds ratio for the incidence of dementia was 0.26 (95% CI: 0.06-1.06) among individuals who consumed green tea every day compared with those who did not consume green tea at all. No association was found between coffee or black tea consumption and the incidence of dementia or MCI. Our results indicate that green tea consumption is significantly associated with reduced risk of cognitive decline, even after adjustment for possible confounding factors. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24828424/Consumption_of_green_tea_but_not_black_tea_or_coffee_is_associated_with_reduced_risk_of_cognitive_decline_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0096013 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -