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Fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols: role in irritable bowel syndrome.

Abstract

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was previously left poorly treated despite its high prevalence and cost. Over the past decade, significant research has been conducted providing new dietary strategies for IBS management. The 'low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols diet' has shown symptom improvement in 68-76% of patients. Randomized, controlled trials have now proven its efficacy. The diet, low in poorly absorbed and fermentable carbohydrates, uses dietary restriction and re-challenge to determine individual tolerance to various short-chain carbohydrates. However there may be potential detrimental effects of the diet in the long term, due to potential changes to the gastrointestinal microbiota. Appropriate dietary education and management of the diet is imperative. Future research should focus on the relevance of changes to the microbiota and ways to liberalize the dietary restrictions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Monash University and Alfred Health, Level 6, The Alfred Centre, 99 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria, 3004 Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24830318

Citation

Tuck, Caroline J., et al. "Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols: Role in Irritable Bowel Syndrome." Expert Review of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, vol. 8, no. 7, 2014, pp. 819-34.
Tuck CJ, Muir JG, Barrett JS, et al. Fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols: role in irritable bowel syndrome. Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;8(7):819-34.
Tuck, C. J., Muir, J. G., Barrett, J. S., & Gibson, P. R. (2014). Fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols: role in irritable bowel syndrome. Expert Review of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 8(7), pp. 819-34. doi:10.1586/17474124.2014.917956.
Tuck CJ, et al. Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols: Role in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;8(7):819-34. PubMed PMID: 24830318.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols: role in irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Tuck,Caroline J, AU - Muir,Jane G, AU - Barrett,Jacqueline S, AU - Gibson,Peter R, Y1 - 2014/05/15/ PY - 2014/5/17/entrez PY - 2014/5/17/pubmed PY - 2015/5/12/medline KW - FODMAP KW - abdominal pain KW - carbohydrates KW - diet therapy KW - gastrointestinal diseases KW - irritable bowel syndrome SP - 819 EP - 34 JF - Expert review of gastroenterology & hepatology JO - Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol VL - 8 IS - 7 N2 - Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was previously left poorly treated despite its high prevalence and cost. Over the past decade, significant research has been conducted providing new dietary strategies for IBS management. The 'low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols diet' has shown symptom improvement in 68-76% of patients. Randomized, controlled trials have now proven its efficacy. The diet, low in poorly absorbed and fermentable carbohydrates, uses dietary restriction and re-challenge to determine individual tolerance to various short-chain carbohydrates. However there may be potential detrimental effects of the diet in the long term, due to potential changes to the gastrointestinal microbiota. Appropriate dietary education and management of the diet is imperative. Future research should focus on the relevance of changes to the microbiota and ways to liberalize the dietary restrictions. SN - 1747-4132 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24830318/Fermentable_oligosaccharides_disaccharides_monosaccharides_and_polyols:_role_in_irritable_bowel_syndrome_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/17474124.2014.917956 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -