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Assessment of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular medical device recalls.
Am J Cardiol. 2014 Jun 01; 113(11):1899-903.AJ

Abstract

Medical device recalls have called attention to the device approval process in the United States. The premarket approval (PMA) process requires clinical trials to evaluate safety and effectiveness, whereas the expedited 510(k) process does not. The 510(k) process has been considered a source of increased recalls. This study aimed to assess the relative safety of medical device approval pathways based on the numbers of approvals and recalls. Data on recalls in the United States from January 2005 to December 2012 were collected from the Food and Drug Administration Web site. Over 8 years, 30,002 devices were approved, 5,728 by PMA (19%) and 24,274 (81%) by 510(k). There were 249 recalls due to serious risks, 0.45% of PMA approvals, and 0.92% of 510(k)-cleared devices, p <0.001. Over 1/2 of the recalls were during the first 2 years on the market. Percentage of recalled PMA devices was unchanged over the 8 years, whereas 510(k) recalls increased in 2010 to 2012 (from 0.65% to 1.39%, p <0.001). Cardiovascular devices represent the largest class of recalls (27%). The proportions of recalled PMA and 510(k) cardiovascular devices were the same as for all medical devices until 2011, but 510(k) recalls dramatically decreased in 2012 to the lowest recall rate seen (0.73%). In conclusion, recall rates were the same for 510(k)- and PMA-approved devices in 2005 to 2009 and increased for 510(k) devices subsequently. Modifying the 510(k) process with more rigorous performance testing, a conditional 2-year approval and a mandatory registry may be an approach to reduce recalls.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine and Clinical Pharmacology, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address: John_Somberg@rush.edu.Department of Medicine and Clinical Pharmacology, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois.American Institute of Therapeutics, Lake Bluff, Illinois.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24837271

Citation

Somberg, John C., et al. "Assessment of Cardiovascular and Noncardiovascular Medical Device Recalls." The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 113, no. 11, 2014, pp. 1899-903.
Somberg JC, McEwen P, Molnar J. Assessment of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular medical device recalls. Am J Cardiol. 2014;113(11):1899-903.
Somberg, J. C., McEwen, P., & Molnar, J. (2014). Assessment of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular medical device recalls. The American Journal of Cardiology, 113(11), 1899-903. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2014.03.024
Somberg JC, McEwen P, Molnar J. Assessment of Cardiovascular and Noncardiovascular Medical Device Recalls. Am J Cardiol. 2014 Jun 1;113(11):1899-903. PubMed PMID: 24837271.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Assessment of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular medical device recalls. AU - Somberg,John C, AU - McEwen,Pauline, AU - Molnar,Janos, Y1 - 2014/03/17/ PY - 2014/02/13/received PY - 2014/03/06/revised PY - 2014/03/06/accepted PY - 2014/5/20/entrez PY - 2014/5/20/pubmed PY - 2014/7/9/medline SP - 1899 EP - 903 JF - The American journal of cardiology JO - Am J Cardiol VL - 113 IS - 11 N2 - Medical device recalls have called attention to the device approval process in the United States. The premarket approval (PMA) process requires clinical trials to evaluate safety and effectiveness, whereas the expedited 510(k) process does not. The 510(k) process has been considered a source of increased recalls. This study aimed to assess the relative safety of medical device approval pathways based on the numbers of approvals and recalls. Data on recalls in the United States from January 2005 to December 2012 were collected from the Food and Drug Administration Web site. Over 8 years, 30,002 devices were approved, 5,728 by PMA (19%) and 24,274 (81%) by 510(k). There were 249 recalls due to serious risks, 0.45% of PMA approvals, and 0.92% of 510(k)-cleared devices, p <0.001. Over 1/2 of the recalls were during the first 2 years on the market. Percentage of recalled PMA devices was unchanged over the 8 years, whereas 510(k) recalls increased in 2010 to 2012 (from 0.65% to 1.39%, p <0.001). Cardiovascular devices represent the largest class of recalls (27%). The proportions of recalled PMA and 510(k) cardiovascular devices were the same as for all medical devices until 2011, but 510(k) recalls dramatically decreased in 2012 to the lowest recall rate seen (0.73%). In conclusion, recall rates were the same for 510(k)- and PMA-approved devices in 2005 to 2009 and increased for 510(k) devices subsequently. Modifying the 510(k) process with more rigorous performance testing, a conditional 2-year approval and a mandatory registry may be an approach to reduce recalls. SN - 1879-1913 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24837271/Assessment_of_cardiovascular_and_noncardiovascular_medical_device_recalls_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9149(14)00814-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -