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Meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk: an evaluation based on a systematic review of epidemiologic evidence among the Japanese population.
Jpn J Clin Oncol 2014; 44(7):641-50JJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The association between meat consumption and colorectal cancer remains inconsistent among Asians. The present study systematically evaluated and meta-analyzed epidemiologic studies on the association between consumption of total and specific meats and colorectal cancer risk among Japanese.

METHODS

Original data were obtained from MEDLINE searched using PubMed or from searches of the Ichushi database, complemented with manual searches. The associations were evaluated based on the strength of evidence, the magnitude of association and biologic plausibility. A meta-analysis was performed according to total meat, red and processed meat as well as poultry and site-specific cancers.

RESULTS

Six cohort studies and 13 case-control studies were identified. In cohort studies, most investigations found no association between total meat consumption and colon/rectal cancer, and several studies showed a weak-to-moderate positive association of red meat and processed meat consumption with colon/rectal cancer. The majority of case-control studies showed no association between total meat consumption and colon and rectal cancer; however, several ones reported a weak-to-strong positive association of red and processed consumption with colon and rectal cancer. In meta-analysis, the summary relative risks (95% confidence interval) for the highest versus lowest categories of red meat consumption were 1.16 (1.001-1.34) and 1.21 (1.03-1.43) for colorectal and colon cancer, respectively, and those for processed meat consumption were 1.17 (1.02-1.35) and 1.23 (1.03-1.47) for colorectal and colon cancer, respectively. Poultry consumption was associated with lower risk of rectal cancer; summary relative risk (95% confidence interval) was 0.80 (0.67-0.96).

CONCLUSIONS

High consumption of red meat and processed meat possibly increases risk of colorectal cancer or colon cancer among the Japanese population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Center for Clinical Sciences, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo.Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Center for Clinical Sciences, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo mizoue@ri.ncgm.go.jp.Department of Preventive Medicine, Saga University Faculty of Medicine, Saga.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Forensic Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai.Department of Public Health, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo.Department of Preventive Medicine, Kyushu University Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka.Department of Preventive Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya.Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu.Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo AXA Department of Health and Human Security, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo.Epidemiology and Prevention Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24842864

Citation

Pham, Ngoc Minh, et al. "Meat Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk: an Evaluation Based On a Systematic Review of Epidemiologic Evidence Among the Japanese Population." Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 44, no. 7, 2014, pp. 641-50.
Pham NM, Mizoue T, Tanaka K, et al. Meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk: an evaluation based on a systematic review of epidemiologic evidence among the Japanese population. Jpn J Clin Oncol. 2014;44(7):641-50.
Pham, N. M., Mizoue, T., Tanaka, K., Tsuji, I., Tamakoshi, A., Matsuo, K., ... Sasazuki, S. (2014). Meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk: an evaluation based on a systematic review of epidemiologic evidence among the Japanese population. Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology, 44(7), pp. 641-50. doi:10.1093/jjco/hyu061.
Pham NM, et al. Meat Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk: an Evaluation Based On a Systematic Review of Epidemiologic Evidence Among the Japanese Population. Jpn J Clin Oncol. 2014;44(7):641-50. PubMed PMID: 24842864.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Meat consumption and colorectal cancer risk: an evaluation based on a systematic review of epidemiologic evidence among the Japanese population. AU - Pham,Ngoc Minh, AU - Mizoue,Tetsuya, AU - Tanaka,Keitaro, AU - Tsuji,Ichiro, AU - Tamakoshi,Akiko, AU - Matsuo,Keitaro, AU - Wakai,Kenji, AU - Nagata,Chisato, AU - Inoue,Manami, AU - Tsugane,Shoichiro, AU - Sasazuki,Shizuka, AU - ,, Y1 - 2014/05/19/ PY - 2014/5/21/entrez PY - 2014/5/21/pubmed PY - 2014/8/26/medline KW - Japanese KW - colorectal cancer KW - epidemiology KW - meat KW - systematic review SP - 641 EP - 50 JF - Japanese journal of clinical oncology JO - Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol. VL - 44 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The association between meat consumption and colorectal cancer remains inconsistent among Asians. The present study systematically evaluated and meta-analyzed epidemiologic studies on the association between consumption of total and specific meats and colorectal cancer risk among Japanese. METHODS: Original data were obtained from MEDLINE searched using PubMed or from searches of the Ichushi database, complemented with manual searches. The associations were evaluated based on the strength of evidence, the magnitude of association and biologic plausibility. A meta-analysis was performed according to total meat, red and processed meat as well as poultry and site-specific cancers. RESULTS: Six cohort studies and 13 case-control studies were identified. In cohort studies, most investigations found no association between total meat consumption and colon/rectal cancer, and several studies showed a weak-to-moderate positive association of red meat and processed meat consumption with colon/rectal cancer. The majority of case-control studies showed no association between total meat consumption and colon and rectal cancer; however, several ones reported a weak-to-strong positive association of red and processed consumption with colon and rectal cancer. In meta-analysis, the summary relative risks (95% confidence interval) for the highest versus lowest categories of red meat consumption were 1.16 (1.001-1.34) and 1.21 (1.03-1.43) for colorectal and colon cancer, respectively, and those for processed meat consumption were 1.17 (1.02-1.35) and 1.23 (1.03-1.47) for colorectal and colon cancer, respectively. Poultry consumption was associated with lower risk of rectal cancer; summary relative risk (95% confidence interval) was 0.80 (0.67-0.96). CONCLUSIONS: High consumption of red meat and processed meat possibly increases risk of colorectal cancer or colon cancer among the Japanese population. SN - 1465-3621 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24842864/Meat_consumption_and_colorectal_cancer_risk:_an_evaluation_based_on_a_systematic_review_of_epidemiologic_evidence_among_the_Japanese_population_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jjco/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jjco/hyu061 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -