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Osseous-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy in dogs: 27 cases (2000-2012).
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2014 Jun 01; 244(11):1309-18.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the signalment, neurologic examination and imaging findings, and outcome in dogs treated medically or surgically for osseous-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (OACSM).

DESIGN

Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS

27 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records for dogs with OACSM (diagnosis made in 2000 through 2012) were reviewed. Collected data included signalment, neurologic examination findings (graded from 0 [normal] to 5 [tetraplegia]), imaging findings, treatment, and outcome. From MRI and CT images, measurements were obtained for subjective grading of spinal cord compression.

RESULTS

Among the 27 dogs, the median age was 2 years; there were 15 Great Danes, 3 Mastiffs, 3 Newfoundlands, and 6 other large-breed dogs. For medically treated dogs (n = 7), the median initial neurologic grade was 2; for surgically treated dogs (20), the median initial neurologic grade was 3. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed dorsolateral spinal cord compression in 22 dogs and lateral spinal cord compression in 5 dogs. Dogs with more severe compressions were slightly more likely to undergo surgical than medical treatment. Median survival time of medically treated dogs was 43 months, and that of surgically treated dogs was 60 months. Fifteen of 19 dogs treated surgically had improved neurologic grades at 4 to 8 weeks after surgery and had a good to excellent long-term outcome.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Surgical treatment of dogs with OACSM resulted in neurologic improvement and was associated with a good long-term outcome. For dogs that received medical treatment, neurologic deterioration continued but some patients did well for several years.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Medical Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24846432

Citation

Gasper, Joy A Delamaide, et al. "Osseous-associated Cervical Spondylomyelopathy in Dogs: 27 Cases (2000-2012)." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 244, no. 11, 2014, pp. 1309-18.
Gasper JA, Rylander H, Stenglein JL, et al. Osseous-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy in dogs: 27 cases (2000-2012). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2014;244(11):1309-18.
Gasper, J. A., Rylander, H., Stenglein, J. L., & Waller, K. R. (2014). Osseous-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy in dogs: 27 cases (2000-2012). Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 244(11), 1309-18. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.244.11.1309
Gasper JA, et al. Osseous-associated Cervical Spondylomyelopathy in Dogs: 27 Cases (2000-2012). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2014 Jun 1;244(11):1309-18. PubMed PMID: 24846432.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Osseous-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy in dogs: 27 cases (2000-2012). AU - Gasper,Joy A Delamaide, AU - Rylander,Helena, AU - Stenglein,Jennifer L, AU - Waller,Kenneth R,3rd PY - 2014/5/22/entrez PY - 2014/5/23/pubmed PY - 2015/1/6/medline SP - 1309 EP - 18 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc. VL - 244 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the signalment, neurologic examination and imaging findings, and outcome in dogs treated medically or surgically for osseous-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (OACSM). DESIGN: Retrospective case series. ANIMALS: 27 client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES: Medical records for dogs with OACSM (diagnosis made in 2000 through 2012) were reviewed. Collected data included signalment, neurologic examination findings (graded from 0 [normal] to 5 [tetraplegia]), imaging findings, treatment, and outcome. From MRI and CT images, measurements were obtained for subjective grading of spinal cord compression. RESULTS: Among the 27 dogs, the median age was 2 years; there were 15 Great Danes, 3 Mastiffs, 3 Newfoundlands, and 6 other large-breed dogs. For medically treated dogs (n = 7), the median initial neurologic grade was 2; for surgically treated dogs (20), the median initial neurologic grade was 3. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed dorsolateral spinal cord compression in 22 dogs and lateral spinal cord compression in 5 dogs. Dogs with more severe compressions were slightly more likely to undergo surgical than medical treatment. Median survival time of medically treated dogs was 43 months, and that of surgically treated dogs was 60 months. Fifteen of 19 dogs treated surgically had improved neurologic grades at 4 to 8 weeks after surgery and had a good to excellent long-term outcome. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Surgical treatment of dogs with OACSM resulted in neurologic improvement and was associated with a good long-term outcome. For dogs that received medical treatment, neurologic deterioration continued but some patients did well for several years. SN - 1943-569X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24846432/Osseous_associated_cervical_spondylomyelopathy_in_dogs:_27_cases__2000_2012__ L2 - http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/full/10.2460/javma.244.11.1309?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -