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Emotion recognition from congruent and incongruent emotional expressions and situational cues in children with autism spectrum disorder.
Autism. 2015 Apr; 19(3):375-9.A

Abstract

In this research, the emotion recognition abilities of children with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing children were compared. When facial expressions and situational cues of emotion were congruent, accuracy in recognizing emotions was good for both children with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing children. When presented with facial expressions incongruent with situational cues, children with autism spectrum disorder relied more on facial cues than situational cues, whereas typically developing children relied more on situational cues. The exception was fear. When presented with incongruent information (i.e. a smiling boy surrounded by a swarm of bees), most children based their response on the situation and indicated that the boy felt scared. While the majority of typically developing children commented on the disparity between facial expressions and situational cues, children with autism spectrum disorder did not mention the conflicting cues. Although typically developing children were more accurate in recognizing emotion with situational cues, children with autism spectrum disorder were still adequate at identifying emotion from situational cues alone. These findings suggest that children with autism spectrum disorder show an understanding of simple emotions in prototypical situations, but may prefer facial expressions when facial expressions and situational cues are incongruent. Reasons for these findings are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Loyola University Chicago, USA.Loyola University Chicago, USA ddavids@luc.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24852752

Citation

Tell, Dina, and Denise Davidson. "Emotion Recognition From Congruent and Incongruent Emotional Expressions and Situational Cues in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder." Autism : the International Journal of Research and Practice, vol. 19, no. 3, 2015, pp. 375-9.
Tell D, Davidson D. Emotion recognition from congruent and incongruent emotional expressions and situational cues in children with autism spectrum disorder. Autism. 2015;19(3):375-9.
Tell, D., & Davidson, D. (2015). Emotion recognition from congruent and incongruent emotional expressions and situational cues in children with autism spectrum disorder. Autism : the International Journal of Research and Practice, 19(3), 375-9. https://doi.org/10.1177/1362361314535676
Tell D, Davidson D. Emotion Recognition From Congruent and Incongruent Emotional Expressions and Situational Cues in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder. Autism. 2015;19(3):375-9. PubMed PMID: 24852752.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emotion recognition from congruent and incongruent emotional expressions and situational cues in children with autism spectrum disorder. AU - Tell,Dina, AU - Davidson,Denise, Y1 - 2014/05/22/ PY - 2014/5/24/entrez PY - 2014/5/24/pubmed PY - 2016/1/7/medline KW - autism spectrum disorder KW - congruent and incongruent emotions KW - emotion recognition SP - 375 EP - 9 JF - Autism : the international journal of research and practice JO - Autism VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - In this research, the emotion recognition abilities of children with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing children were compared. When facial expressions and situational cues of emotion were congruent, accuracy in recognizing emotions was good for both children with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing children. When presented with facial expressions incongruent with situational cues, children with autism spectrum disorder relied more on facial cues than situational cues, whereas typically developing children relied more on situational cues. The exception was fear. When presented with incongruent information (i.e. a smiling boy surrounded by a swarm of bees), most children based their response on the situation and indicated that the boy felt scared. While the majority of typically developing children commented on the disparity between facial expressions and situational cues, children with autism spectrum disorder did not mention the conflicting cues. Although typically developing children were more accurate in recognizing emotion with situational cues, children with autism spectrum disorder were still adequate at identifying emotion from situational cues alone. These findings suggest that children with autism spectrum disorder show an understanding of simple emotions in prototypical situations, but may prefer facial expressions when facial expressions and situational cues are incongruent. Reasons for these findings are discussed. SN - 1461-7005 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24852752/Emotion_recognition_from_congruent_and_incongruent_emotional_expressions_and_situational_cues_in_children_with_autism_spectrum_disorder_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -