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Microscopy outperformed in a comparison of five methods for detecting Trichomonas vaginalis in symptomatic women.
Int J STD AIDS. 2015 Mar; 26(4):251-6.IJ

Abstract

In the UK, despite its low sensitivity, wet mount microscopy is often the only method of detecting Trichomonas vaginalis infection. A study was conducted in symptomatic women to compare the performance of five methods for detecting T. vaginalis: an in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR); Aptima T. vaginalis kit; OSOM ®Trichomonas Rapid Test; culture and microscopy. Symptomatic women underwent routine testing; microscopy and further swabs were taken for molecular testing, OSOM and culture. A true positive was defined as a sample that was positive for T. vaginalis by two or more different methods. Two hundred and forty-six women were recruited: 24 patients were positive for T. vaginalis by two or more different methods. Of these 24 patients, 21 patients were detected by real-time PCR (sensitivity 88%); 22 patients were detected by the Aptima T. vaginalis kit (sensitivity 92%); 22 patients were detected by OSOM (sensitivity 92%); nine were detected by wet mount microscopy (sensitivity 38%); and 21 were detected by culture (sensitivity 88%). Two patients were positive by just one method and were not considered true positives. All the other detection methods had a sensitivity to detect T. vaginalis that was significantly greater than wet mount microscopy, highlighting the number of cases that are routinely missed even in symptomatic women if microscopy is the only diagnostic method available.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sexual Health and HIV Medicine, Caldecot Centre, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.Sexually Transmitted Bacteria Reference Laboratory (STBRL), Public Health England Centre for Infections, London, UK.Sexually Transmitted Bacteria Reference Laboratory (STBRL), Public Health England Centre for Infections, London, UK.Department of Sexual Health and HIV Medicine, Caldecot Centre, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.Sexually Transmitted Bacteria Reference Laboratory (STBRL), Public Health England Centre for Infections, London, UK.Department of Sexual Health and HIV Medicine, Caldecot Centre, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.Sexually Transmitted Bacteria Reference Laboratory (STBRL), Public Health England Centre for Infections, London, UK.Department of Sexual Health and HIV Medicine, Caldecot Centre, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.Sexually Transmitted Bacteria Reference Laboratory (STBRL), Public Health England Centre for Infections, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24855131

Citation

Nathan, B, et al. "Microscopy Outperformed in a Comparison of Five Methods for Detecting Trichomonas Vaginalis in Symptomatic Women." International Journal of STD & AIDS, vol. 26, no. 4, 2015, pp. 251-6.
Nathan B, Appiah J, Saunders P, et al. Microscopy outperformed in a comparison of five methods for detecting Trichomonas vaginalis in symptomatic women. Int J STD AIDS. 2015;26(4):251-6.
Nathan, B., Appiah, J., Saunders, P., Heron, D., Nichols, T., Brum, R., Alexander, S., Baraitser, P., & Ison, C. (2015). Microscopy outperformed in a comparison of five methods for detecting Trichomonas vaginalis in symptomatic women. International Journal of STD & AIDS, 26(4), 251-6. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956462414534833
Nathan B, et al. Microscopy Outperformed in a Comparison of Five Methods for Detecting Trichomonas Vaginalis in Symptomatic Women. Int J STD AIDS. 2015;26(4):251-6. PubMed PMID: 24855131.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microscopy outperformed in a comparison of five methods for detecting Trichomonas vaginalis in symptomatic women. AU - Nathan,B, AU - Appiah,J, AU - Saunders,P, AU - Heron,D, AU - Nichols,T, AU - Brum,R, AU - Alexander,S, AU - Baraitser,P, AU - Ison,C, Y1 - 2014/05/22/ PY - 2014/5/24/entrez PY - 2014/5/24/pubmed PY - 2015/5/12/medline KW - London KW - Trichomonas vaginalis KW - culture KW - diagnosis KW - human immunodeficiency virus KW - microscopy KW - nucleic acid amplification test KW - point of care test KW - sexually transmitted infection KW - symptomatic KW - women SP - 251 EP - 6 JF - International journal of STD & AIDS JO - Int J STD AIDS VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - In the UK, despite its low sensitivity, wet mount microscopy is often the only method of detecting Trichomonas vaginalis infection. A study was conducted in symptomatic women to compare the performance of five methods for detecting T. vaginalis: an in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR); Aptima T. vaginalis kit; OSOM ®Trichomonas Rapid Test; culture and microscopy. Symptomatic women underwent routine testing; microscopy and further swabs were taken for molecular testing, OSOM and culture. A true positive was defined as a sample that was positive for T. vaginalis by two or more different methods. Two hundred and forty-six women were recruited: 24 patients were positive for T. vaginalis by two or more different methods. Of these 24 patients, 21 patients were detected by real-time PCR (sensitivity 88%); 22 patients were detected by the Aptima T. vaginalis kit (sensitivity 92%); 22 patients were detected by OSOM (sensitivity 92%); nine were detected by wet mount microscopy (sensitivity 38%); and 21 were detected by culture (sensitivity 88%). Two patients were positive by just one method and were not considered true positives. All the other detection methods had a sensitivity to detect T. vaginalis that was significantly greater than wet mount microscopy, highlighting the number of cases that are routinely missed even in symptomatic women if microscopy is the only diagnostic method available. SN - 1758-1052 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24855131/Microscopy_outperformed_in_a_comparison_of_five_methods_for_detecting_Trichomonas_vaginalis_in_symptomatic_women_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0956462414534833?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -