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Epidemiology and etiology of acute encephalitis syndrome in North India.
Jpn J Infect Dis. 2014; 67(3):197-203.JJ

Abstract

Acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) is a major public health problem in eastern Uttar Pradesh, claiming thousands of lives every year. Here we report the common viral etiologic agents of AES and its epidemiology in the vicinity of Lucknow in Uttar Pradesh, North India. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from patients with AES, who were referred to a viral diagnostic laboratory from January 2011 to December 2012, were tested for IgM antibodies against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), dengue virus (DV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), measles virus, mumps virus, varicella zoster virus (VZV), and enterovirus using commercial enzyme immuno-assays. Of the 1,578 enrolled patients, JEV was the most commonly detected (16.2%), followed by DV (10.8%), HSV (9.3%), measles virus (8.9%), mumps virus (8.7%), VZV (4.4%), and enterovirus (0%). Co-positivity with more than 1 virus was observed in 12 patients. The demographic distribution of patients pertaining to age, sex, and geographic and seasonal variation is discussed. Maximum mortality was caused by JEV infection, while patients with HSV infection had maximum residual neuro-psychiatric disability. JEV and DV are the chief causative agents of AES in North India, although other viruses should also be considered in a differential diagnosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Virology Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, King George's Medical University.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24858609

Citation

Jain, Parul, et al. "Epidemiology and Etiology of Acute Encephalitis Syndrome in North India." Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 67, no. 3, 2014, pp. 197-203.
Jain P, Jain A, Kumar A, et al. Epidemiology and etiology of acute encephalitis syndrome in North India. Jpn J Infect Dis. 2014;67(3):197-203.
Jain, P., Jain, A., Kumar, A., Prakash, S., Khan, D. N., Singh, K. P., Garg, R. K., Kumar, R., & Kumar, G. A. (2014). Epidemiology and etiology of acute encephalitis syndrome in North India. Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases, 67(3), 197-203.
Jain P, et al. Epidemiology and Etiology of Acute Encephalitis Syndrome in North India. Jpn J Infect Dis. 2014;67(3):197-203. PubMed PMID: 24858609.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology and etiology of acute encephalitis syndrome in North India. AU - Jain,Parul, AU - Jain,Amita, AU - Kumar,Arvind, AU - Prakash,Shantanu, AU - Khan,Danish Nasar, AU - Singh,Kaleshwar Prasad, AU - Garg,Ravindra Kumar, AU - Kumar,Rashmi, AU - Kumar,G Arun, PY - 2014/5/27/entrez PY - 2014/5/27/pubmed PY - 2015/3/4/medline SP - 197 EP - 203 JF - Japanese journal of infectious diseases JO - Jpn J Infect Dis VL - 67 IS - 3 N2 - Acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) is a major public health problem in eastern Uttar Pradesh, claiming thousands of lives every year. Here we report the common viral etiologic agents of AES and its epidemiology in the vicinity of Lucknow in Uttar Pradesh, North India. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from patients with AES, who were referred to a viral diagnostic laboratory from January 2011 to December 2012, were tested for IgM antibodies against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), dengue virus (DV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), measles virus, mumps virus, varicella zoster virus (VZV), and enterovirus using commercial enzyme immuno-assays. Of the 1,578 enrolled patients, JEV was the most commonly detected (16.2%), followed by DV (10.8%), HSV (9.3%), measles virus (8.9%), mumps virus (8.7%), VZV (4.4%), and enterovirus (0%). Co-positivity with more than 1 virus was observed in 12 patients. The demographic distribution of patients pertaining to age, sex, and geographic and seasonal variation is discussed. Maximum mortality was caused by JEV infection, while patients with HSV infection had maximum residual neuro-psychiatric disability. JEV and DV are the chief causative agents of AES in North India, although other viruses should also be considered in a differential diagnosis. SN - 1884-2836 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24858609/Epidemiology_and_etiology_of_acute_encephalitis_syndrome_in_North_India_ L2 - http://japanlinkcenter.org/DN/JST.JSTAGE/yoken/67.197?lang=en&from=PubMed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -