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Cholera in the United States, 2001-2011: a reflection of patterns of global epidemiology and travel.
Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Mar; 143(4):695-703.EI

Abstract

US cholera surveillance offers insight into global and domestic trends. Between 2001 and 2011, 111 cases were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cholera was associated with international travel in 90 (81%) patients and was domestically acquired in 20 (18%) patients; for one patient, information was not available. From January 2001 to October 2010, the 42 (47%) travel-associated cases were associated with travel to Asia. In October 2010, a cholera epidemic started in Haiti, soon spreading to the Dominican Republic (Hispaniola). From then to December 2011, 40 (83%) of the 48 travel-associated cases were associated with travel to Hispaniola. Of 20 patients who acquired cholera domestically, 17 (85%) reported seafood consumption; 10 (59%) ate seafood from the US Gulf Coast. In summary, an increase in travel-associated US cholera cases was associated with epidemic cholera in Hispaniola in 2010-2011. Travel to Asia and consumption of Gulf Coast seafood remained important sources of US cholera cases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Office of Workforce and Career Development,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,Atlanta, GA,USA.Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,Atlanta, GA,USA.Enteric Diseases Laboratory Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,Atlanta, GA,USA.Enteric Diseases Laboratory Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,Atlanta, GA,USA.Enteric Diseases Laboratory Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,Atlanta, GA,USA.Enteric Diseases Laboratory Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,Atlanta, GA,USA.Enteric Diseases Laboratory Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,Atlanta, GA,USA.Enteric Diseases Laboratory Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,Atlanta, GA,USA.Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,Atlanta, GA,USA.Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases,Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,Atlanta, GA,USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24865664

Citation

Loharikar, A, et al. "Cholera in the United States, 2001-2011: a Reflection of Patterns of Global Epidemiology and Travel." Epidemiology and Infection, vol. 143, no. 4, 2015, pp. 695-703.
Loharikar A, Newton AE, Stroika S, et al. Cholera in the United States, 2001-2011: a reflection of patterns of global epidemiology and travel. Epidemiol Infect. 2015;143(4):695-703.
Loharikar, A., Newton, A. E., Stroika, S., Freeman, M., Greene, K. D., Parsons, M. B., Bopp, C., Talkington, D., Mintz, E. D., & Mahon, B. E. (2015). Cholera in the United States, 2001-2011: a reflection of patterns of global epidemiology and travel. Epidemiology and Infection, 143(4), 695-703. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268814001186
Loharikar A, et al. Cholera in the United States, 2001-2011: a Reflection of Patterns of Global Epidemiology and Travel. Epidemiol Infect. 2015;143(4):695-703. PubMed PMID: 24865664.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cholera in the United States, 2001-2011: a reflection of patterns of global epidemiology and travel. AU - Loharikar,A, AU - Newton,A E, AU - Stroika,S, AU - Freeman,M, AU - Greene,K D, AU - Parsons,M B, AU - Bopp,C, AU - Talkington,D, AU - Mintz,E D, AU - Mahon,B E, Y1 - 2014/05/27/ PY - 2014/5/29/entrez PY - 2014/5/29/pubmed PY - 2015/4/22/medline KW - Hispaniola SP - 695 EP - 703 JF - Epidemiology and infection JO - Epidemiol. Infect. VL - 143 IS - 4 N2 - US cholera surveillance offers insight into global and domestic trends. Between 2001 and 2011, 111 cases were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Cholera was associated with international travel in 90 (81%) patients and was domestically acquired in 20 (18%) patients; for one patient, information was not available. From January 2001 to October 2010, the 42 (47%) travel-associated cases were associated with travel to Asia. In October 2010, a cholera epidemic started in Haiti, soon spreading to the Dominican Republic (Hispaniola). From then to December 2011, 40 (83%) of the 48 travel-associated cases were associated with travel to Hispaniola. Of 20 patients who acquired cholera domestically, 17 (85%) reported seafood consumption; 10 (59%) ate seafood from the US Gulf Coast. In summary, an increase in travel-associated US cholera cases was associated with epidemic cholera in Hispaniola in 2010-2011. Travel to Asia and consumption of Gulf Coast seafood remained important sources of US cholera cases. SN - 1469-4409 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24865664/full_citation L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0950268814001186/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -