Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Factors influencing dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Lebanon and Jordan: results of the Dyslipidemia International Study.
Vasc Health Risk Manag 2014; 10:225-35VH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Therefore, as part of the Dyslipidemia International Study (DYSIS), we have analyzed the prevalence of lipid abnormalities and risk factors for dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Lebanon and Jordan.

METHODS

This cross-sectional, multicenter study enrolled 617 patients at 13 hospitals in Lebanon and Jordan. Patients were at least 45 years old and had been treated with statins for at least 3 months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine patient characteristics contributing to dyslipidemia during statin therapy.

RESULTS

Our findings indicated that 55.9% of statin-treated patients (mean age 60.3 years, 47% female) in Lebanon and Jordan did not achieve goal levels for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol which were dependent on Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) risk, and 70% of patients (76% men and 63.3% of women) were at very high cardiovascular risk. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals were not achieved in 67.2% of those with very high cardiovascular risk. The most commonly prescribed statin was atorvastatin (44.6%), followed by simvastatin (27.7%), rosuvastatin (21.2%), fluvastatin (3.3%), pravastatin (3%), and lovastatin (0.2%). Approximately half of the population was treated with a statin dose potency of 4, equaling 40 mg of simvastatin. In Lebanon and Jordan, the strongest independent associations with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol not at goal were current smoking (odds ratio [OR] 1.96; 95% confidence [CI] 1.25-3.08), diabetes mellitus (OR 2.53; 95% CI 1.70-3.77), and ischemic heart disease (OR 2.26; 95% CI 1.45-3.53), while alcohol consumption was associated with reduced risk (OR 0.12; 95% CI 0.03-0.57).

CONCLUSION

We observed that many patients in Lebanon and Jordan experienced persistent dyslipidemia during statin treatment, supporting the notion that novel lipid-lowering strategies need to be developed. Also, social programs aimed at combating the extremely high rates of tobacco use and obesity in Lebanon and Jordan are critical for combating cardiovascular disease in these countries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon.Istishari Hospital, Amman, Jordan.St Joseph University Faculty of Medicine, Beirut, Lebanon.Jordan Hospital, Amman, Jordan.Notre Dame des Secours Hospital, Jbeil, Lebanon.MSD Levant, Beirut, Lebanon.MSD Levant, Beirut, Lebanon.Istishari Hospital, Amman, Jordan.Institut für Pharmakologie und präventive Medizin, Mahlow, Germany.Merck and Co, Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA.Merck and Co, Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24872710

Citation

Azar, Sami T., et al. "Factors Influencing Dyslipidemia in Statin-treated Patients in Lebanon and Jordan: Results of the Dyslipidemia International Study." Vascular Health and Risk Management, vol. 10, 2014, pp. 225-35.
Azar ST, Hantash HA, Jambart S, et al. Factors influencing dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Lebanon and Jordan: results of the Dyslipidemia International Study. Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2014;10:225-35.
Azar, S. T., Hantash, H. A., Jambart, S., El-Zaheri, M. M., Rachoin, R., Chalfoun, A., ... Ambegaonkar, B. M. (2014). Factors influencing dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Lebanon and Jordan: results of the Dyslipidemia International Study. Vascular Health and Risk Management, 10, pp. 225-35. doi:10.2147/VHRM.S57194.
Azar ST, et al. Factors Influencing Dyslipidemia in Statin-treated Patients in Lebanon and Jordan: Results of the Dyslipidemia International Study. Vasc Health Risk Manag. 2014;10:225-35. PubMed PMID: 24872710.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors influencing dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Lebanon and Jordan: results of the Dyslipidemia International Study. AU - Azar,Sami T, AU - Hantash,Hadi Abu, AU - Jambart,Selim, AU - El-Zaheri,Mohamed M, AU - Rachoin,Rachoin, AU - Chalfoun,Amal, AU - Lahoud,Layla, AU - Okkeh,Osama, AU - Bramlage,Peter, AU - Brudi,Philippe, AU - Ambegaonkar,Baishali M, Y1 - 2014/05/07/ PY - 2014/5/30/entrez PY - 2014/5/30/pubmed PY - 2014/9/3/medline KW - cardiovascular disease KW - lipid abnormalities KW - low-density lipoprotein cholesterol KW - statins SP - 225 EP - 35 JF - Vascular health and risk management JO - Vasc Health Risk Manag VL - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Therefore, as part of the Dyslipidemia International Study (DYSIS), we have analyzed the prevalence of lipid abnormalities and risk factors for dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Lebanon and Jordan. METHODS: This cross-sectional, multicenter study enrolled 617 patients at 13 hospitals in Lebanon and Jordan. Patients were at least 45 years old and had been treated with statins for at least 3 months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine patient characteristics contributing to dyslipidemia during statin therapy. RESULTS: Our findings indicated that 55.9% of statin-treated patients (mean age 60.3 years, 47% female) in Lebanon and Jordan did not achieve goal levels for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol which were dependent on Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) risk, and 70% of patients (76% men and 63.3% of women) were at very high cardiovascular risk. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals were not achieved in 67.2% of those with very high cardiovascular risk. The most commonly prescribed statin was atorvastatin (44.6%), followed by simvastatin (27.7%), rosuvastatin (21.2%), fluvastatin (3.3%), pravastatin (3%), and lovastatin (0.2%). Approximately half of the population was treated with a statin dose potency of 4, equaling 40 mg of simvastatin. In Lebanon and Jordan, the strongest independent associations with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol not at goal were current smoking (odds ratio [OR] 1.96; 95% confidence [CI] 1.25-3.08), diabetes mellitus (OR 2.53; 95% CI 1.70-3.77), and ischemic heart disease (OR 2.26; 95% CI 1.45-3.53), while alcohol consumption was associated with reduced risk (OR 0.12; 95% CI 0.03-0.57). CONCLUSION: We observed that many patients in Lebanon and Jordan experienced persistent dyslipidemia during statin treatment, supporting the notion that novel lipid-lowering strategies need to be developed. Also, social programs aimed at combating the extremely high rates of tobacco use and obesity in Lebanon and Jordan are critical for combating cardiovascular disease in these countries. SN - 1178-2048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24872710/Factors_influencing_dyslipidemia_in_statin_treated_patients_in_Lebanon_and_Jordan:_results_of_the_Dyslipidemia_International_Study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S57194 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -