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Effects of black tea on body composition and metabolic outcomes related to cardiovascular disease risk: a randomized controlled trial.
Food Funct 2014; 5(7):1613-20FF

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that tea and its non-caffeine components (primarily flavonoids) contribute to cardiovascular health. Randomized controlled trials have shown that tea can improve cardiovascular disease risk factors. We have previously reported a non-caffeine associated beneficial effect of regular black tea consumption on blood pressure and its variation.

OBJECTIVE

To explore the non-caffeine associated effects of black tea on body weight and body fat distribution, and cardiovascular disease related metabolic outcomes.

DESIGN

regular tea-drinking men and women (n = 111; BMI 20-35 kg m(-2)) were recruited to a randomized controlled double-blind 6 month parallel-designed trial. Participants consumed 3 cups per day of either powdered black tea solids (tea) or a flavonoid-free flavour- and caffeine-matched placebo (control). Body weight, waist- and hip-circumference, endothelial function and plasma biomarkers were assessed at baseline, 3 months and 6 months.

RESULTS

Compared to control, regular ingestion of black tea over 3 months inhibited weight gain (-0.64 kg, p = 0.047) and reduced waist circumference (-1.88 cm, P = 0.035) and waist-to-hip ratio (-0.03, P = 0.005). These effects were no longer significant at 6 months. There were no significant effects observed on fasting glucose, insulin, plasma lipids or endothelial function.

CONCLUSION

Our study suggests that short-term regular ingestion of black tea over 3 months can improve body weight and body fat distribution, compared to a caffeine-matched control beverage. However, there was no evidence that these effects were sustained beyond 3 months.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. s.k.bohn@medisin.uio.no.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24889137

Citation

Bøhn, Siv K., et al. "Effects of Black Tea On Body Composition and Metabolic Outcomes Related to Cardiovascular Disease Risk: a Randomized Controlled Trial." Food & Function, vol. 5, no. 7, 2014, pp. 1613-20.
Bøhn SK, Croft KD, Burrows S, et al. Effects of black tea on body composition and metabolic outcomes related to cardiovascular disease risk: a randomized controlled trial. Food Funct. 2014;5(7):1613-20.
Bøhn, S. K., Croft, K. D., Burrows, S., Puddey, I. B., Mulder, T. P., Fuchs, D., ... Hodgson, J. M. (2014). Effects of black tea on body composition and metabolic outcomes related to cardiovascular disease risk: a randomized controlled trial. Food & Function, 5(7), pp. 1613-20. doi:10.1039/c4fo00209a.
Bøhn SK, et al. Effects of Black Tea On Body Composition and Metabolic Outcomes Related to Cardiovascular Disease Risk: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Food Funct. 2014 Jul 25;5(7):1613-20. PubMed PMID: 24889137.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of black tea on body composition and metabolic outcomes related to cardiovascular disease risk: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Bøhn,Siv K, AU - Croft,Kevin D, AU - Burrows,Sally, AU - Puddey,Ian B, AU - Mulder,Theo P J, AU - Fuchs,Dagmar, AU - Woodman,Richard J, AU - Hodgson,Jonathan M, PY - 2014/6/4/entrez PY - 2014/6/4/pubmed PY - 2015/2/24/medline SP - 1613 EP - 20 JF - Food & function JO - Food Funct VL - 5 IS - 7 N2 - UNLABELLED: There is increasing evidence that tea and its non-caffeine components (primarily flavonoids) contribute to cardiovascular health. Randomized controlled trials have shown that tea can improve cardiovascular disease risk factors. We have previously reported a non-caffeine associated beneficial effect of regular black tea consumption on blood pressure and its variation. OBJECTIVE: To explore the non-caffeine associated effects of black tea on body weight and body fat distribution, and cardiovascular disease related metabolic outcomes. DESIGN: regular tea-drinking men and women (n = 111; BMI 20-35 kg m(-2)) were recruited to a randomized controlled double-blind 6 month parallel-designed trial. Participants consumed 3 cups per day of either powdered black tea solids (tea) or a flavonoid-free flavour- and caffeine-matched placebo (control). Body weight, waist- and hip-circumference, endothelial function and plasma biomarkers were assessed at baseline, 3 months and 6 months. RESULTS: Compared to control, regular ingestion of black tea over 3 months inhibited weight gain (-0.64 kg, p = 0.047) and reduced waist circumference (-1.88 cm, P = 0.035) and waist-to-hip ratio (-0.03, P = 0.005). These effects were no longer significant at 6 months. There were no significant effects observed on fasting glucose, insulin, plasma lipids or endothelial function. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that short-term regular ingestion of black tea over 3 months can improve body weight and body fat distribution, compared to a caffeine-matched control beverage. However, there was no evidence that these effects were sustained beyond 3 months. SN - 2042-650X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24889137/Effects_of_black_tea_on_body_composition_and_metabolic_outcomes_related_to_cardiovascular_disease_risk:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/c4fo00209a DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -