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Soy foods, isoflavones, and the health of postmenopausal women.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jul; 100 Suppl 1:423S-30S.AJ

Abstract

Over the past 2 decades, soy foods have been the subject of a vast amount of research, primarily because they are uniquely rich sources of isoflavones. Isoflavones are classified as both phytoestrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators. The phytoestrogenic effects of isoflavones have led some to view soy foods and isoflavone supplements as alternatives to conventional hormone therapy. However, clinical research shows that isoflavones and estrogen exert differing effects on a variety of health outcomes. Nevertheless, there is substantial evidence that soy foods have the potential to address several conditions and diseases associated with the menopausal transition. For example, data suggest that soy foods can potentially reduce ischemic heart disease through multiple mechanisms. Soy protein directly lowers blood low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations, and the soybean is low in saturated fat and a source of both essential fatty acids, the omega-6 fatty acid linoleic acid and the omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid. In addition, soflavones improve endothelial function and possibly slow the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis. Isoflavone supplements also consistently alleviate menopausal hot flashes provided they contain sufficient amounts of the predominant soybean isoflavone genistein. In contrast, the evidence that isoflavones reduce bone loss in postmenopausal women is unimpressive. Whether adult soy food intake reduces breast cancer risk is unclear. Considerable evidence suggests that for soy to reduce risk, consumption during childhood and/or adolescence is required. Although concerns have been raised that soy food consumption may be harmful to breast cancer patients, an analysis in 9514 breast cancer survivors who were followed for 7.4 y found that higher postdiagnosis soy intake was associated with a significant 25% reduction in tumor recurrence. In summary, the clinical and epidemiologic data indicate that adding soy foods to the diet can contribute to the health of postmenopausal women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From Nutrition Matters Inc, Port Townsend, WA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24898224

Citation

Messina, Mark. "Soy Foods, Isoflavones, and the Health of Postmenopausal Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 100 Suppl 1, 2014, 423S-30S.
Messina M. Soy foods, isoflavones, and the health of postmenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100 Suppl 1:423S-30S.
Messina, M. (2014). Soy foods, isoflavones, and the health of postmenopausal women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 100 Suppl 1, 423S-30S. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.113.071464
Messina M. Soy Foods, Isoflavones, and the Health of Postmenopausal Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100 Suppl 1:423S-30S. PubMed PMID: 24898224.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Soy foods, isoflavones, and the health of postmenopausal women. A1 - Messina,Mark, Y1 - 2014/06/04/ PY - 2014/6/6/entrez PY - 2014/6/6/pubmed PY - 2015/5/2/medline SP - 423S EP - 30S JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 100 Suppl 1 N2 - Over the past 2 decades, soy foods have been the subject of a vast amount of research, primarily because they are uniquely rich sources of isoflavones. Isoflavones are classified as both phytoestrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators. The phytoestrogenic effects of isoflavones have led some to view soy foods and isoflavone supplements as alternatives to conventional hormone therapy. However, clinical research shows that isoflavones and estrogen exert differing effects on a variety of health outcomes. Nevertheless, there is substantial evidence that soy foods have the potential to address several conditions and diseases associated with the menopausal transition. For example, data suggest that soy foods can potentially reduce ischemic heart disease through multiple mechanisms. Soy protein directly lowers blood low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations, and the soybean is low in saturated fat and a source of both essential fatty acids, the omega-6 fatty acid linoleic acid and the omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid. In addition, soflavones improve endothelial function and possibly slow the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis. Isoflavone supplements also consistently alleviate menopausal hot flashes provided they contain sufficient amounts of the predominant soybean isoflavone genistein. In contrast, the evidence that isoflavones reduce bone loss in postmenopausal women is unimpressive. Whether adult soy food intake reduces breast cancer risk is unclear. Considerable evidence suggests that for soy to reduce risk, consumption during childhood and/or adolescence is required. Although concerns have been raised that soy food consumption may be harmful to breast cancer patients, an analysis in 9514 breast cancer survivors who were followed for 7.4 y found that higher postdiagnosis soy intake was associated with a significant 25% reduction in tumor recurrence. In summary, the clinical and epidemiologic data indicate that adding soy foods to the diet can contribute to the health of postmenopausal women. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24898224/Soy_foods_isoflavones_and_the_health_of_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.113.071464 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -