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Long-term associations of nut consumption with body weight and obesity.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Jul; 100 Suppl 1:408S-11S.AJ

Abstract

There is some concern that the high-fat, energy-dense content of nuts may promote weight gain. Nuts, however, are rich in protein and dietary fiber, which are associated with increased satiety. They also contain high amounts of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and phytoesterols that may confer health benefits for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes delay and prevention. Therefore, it is important to determine the association between nut consumption and long-term weight change and disease risk to reach scientific consensus and to make evidence-based public health recommendations. Several cross-sectional analyses have shown an inverse association between higher nut consumption and lower body weight. In addition, several independent prospective studies found that increasing nut consumption was associated with lower weight gain over relatively long periods of time. Moreover, high consumption of nuts (especially walnuts) has been associated with lower diabetes risk. Therefore, regular consumption (approximately one handful daily) of nuts over the long term, as a replacement to less healthful foods, can be incorporated as a component of a healthy diet for the prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.From the Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24898229

Citation

Jackson, Chandra L., and Frank B. Hu. "Long-term Associations of Nut Consumption With Body Weight and Obesity." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 100 Suppl 1, 2014, 408S-11S.
Jackson CL, Hu FB. Long-term associations of nut consumption with body weight and obesity. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100 Suppl 1:408S-11S.
Jackson, C. L., & Hu, F. B. (2014). Long-term associations of nut consumption with body weight and obesity. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 100 Suppl 1, 408S-11S. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.113.071332
Jackson CL, Hu FB. Long-term Associations of Nut Consumption With Body Weight and Obesity. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;100 Suppl 1:408S-11S. PubMed PMID: 24898229.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term associations of nut consumption with body weight and obesity. AU - Jackson,Chandra L, AU - Hu,Frank B, Y1 - 2014/06/04/ PY - 2014/6/6/entrez PY - 2014/6/6/pubmed PY - 2015/5/2/medline SP - 408S EP - 11S JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 100 Suppl 1 N2 - There is some concern that the high-fat, energy-dense content of nuts may promote weight gain. Nuts, however, are rich in protein and dietary fiber, which are associated with increased satiety. They also contain high amounts of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and phytoesterols that may confer health benefits for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes delay and prevention. Therefore, it is important to determine the association between nut consumption and long-term weight change and disease risk to reach scientific consensus and to make evidence-based public health recommendations. Several cross-sectional analyses have shown an inverse association between higher nut consumption and lower body weight. In addition, several independent prospective studies found that increasing nut consumption was associated with lower weight gain over relatively long periods of time. Moreover, high consumption of nuts (especially walnuts) has been associated with lower diabetes risk. Therefore, regular consumption (approximately one handful daily) of nuts over the long term, as a replacement to less healthful foods, can be incorporated as a component of a healthy diet for the prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24898229/Long_term_associations_of_nut_consumption_with_body_weight_and_obesity_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.113.071332 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -