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In vitro mechanical testing of braided polyurethane elastic fiber and braided polyester for equine laryngoplasty.
Vet Surg. 2015 Feb; 44(2):223-30.VS

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

In vitro comparison of the mechanical properties of braided polyurethane elastomer (Lycra®) and braided polyester (Ethibond™) (1) when inserted into the muscular process of the arytenoid cartilage and (2) as suture loops.

STUDY DESIGN

Experimental.

ANIMALS

Equine cadaver larynges (n = 15).

METHODS

The muscular processes (n = 30) of the arytenoid cartilages were dissected from each larynx and embedded in a resin base. Lycra® and Ethibond™ prostheses were randomly allocated to the left or right muscular process and each underwent cyclic fatigue (25-50 N) followed by load-to-failure testing. Isolated suture loops of Lycra® (n = 25) and Ethibond™ (n = 25) also underwent the same cyclic fatigue followed by load-to-failure testing (n = 20) or a creep testing protocol (25 N for 10 min; n = 5).

RESULTS

Lycra® prostheses pulled through the cartilage in a significantly greater proportion of cyclic tests (P = .015) and at lower mean (±SD) loads, (95.9 ± 23.4 N) during load-to-failure testing than Ethibond™ prostheses (155.2 ± 24.4 N; P = .0041). Lycra® had a significantly greater displacement with and without a cartilage interface when compared to Ethibond™ (P < .001, P < .002). The Lycra® isolated suture loops failed at significantly greater loads (233.0 ± 38.7 N) during load-to-failure testing than Ethibond™ loops (201.6 ± 47.4 N; P = .042).

CONCLUSIONS

Lycra® prostheses embedded in laryngeal cartilage pulled through the cartilage at lower loads than Ethibond™ prostheses. Lycra® suture loops were stronger than Ethibond™ suture loops. Lycra® had greater displacement than Ethibond™ in all tests as suture loops or when embedded in cartilage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24899267

Citation

Willsallen, Hadley, et al. "In Vitro Mechanical Testing of Braided Polyurethane Elastic Fiber and Braided Polyester for Equine Laryngoplasty." Veterinary Surgery : VS, vol. 44, no. 2, 2015, pp. 223-30.
Willsallen H, Heller J, Kark L, et al. In vitro mechanical testing of braided polyurethane elastic fiber and braided polyester for equine laryngoplasty. Vet Surg. 2015;44(2):223-30.
Willsallen, H., Heller, J., Kark, L., & Hilbert, B. J. (2015). In vitro mechanical testing of braided polyurethane elastic fiber and braided polyester for equine laryngoplasty. Veterinary Surgery : VS, 44(2), 223-30. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-950X.2014.12184.x
Willsallen H, et al. In Vitro Mechanical Testing of Braided Polyurethane Elastic Fiber and Braided Polyester for Equine Laryngoplasty. Vet Surg. 2015;44(2):223-30. PubMed PMID: 24899267.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vitro mechanical testing of braided polyurethane elastic fiber and braided polyester for equine laryngoplasty. AU - Willsallen,Hadley, AU - Heller,Jane, AU - Kark,Lauren, AU - Hilbert,Bryan J, Y1 - 2014/06/05/ PY - 2013/03/01/received PY - 2013/07/01/accepted PY - 2014/6/6/entrez PY - 2014/6/6/pubmed PY - 2015/8/8/medline SP - 223 EP - 30 JF - Veterinary surgery : VS JO - Vet Surg VL - 44 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: In vitro comparison of the mechanical properties of braided polyurethane elastomer (Lycra®) and braided polyester (Ethibond™) (1) when inserted into the muscular process of the arytenoid cartilage and (2) as suture loops. STUDY DESIGN: Experimental. ANIMALS: Equine cadaver larynges (n = 15). METHODS: The muscular processes (n = 30) of the arytenoid cartilages were dissected from each larynx and embedded in a resin base. Lycra® and Ethibond™ prostheses were randomly allocated to the left or right muscular process and each underwent cyclic fatigue (25-50 N) followed by load-to-failure testing. Isolated suture loops of Lycra® (n = 25) and Ethibond™ (n = 25) also underwent the same cyclic fatigue followed by load-to-failure testing (n = 20) or a creep testing protocol (25 N for 10 min; n = 5). RESULTS: Lycra® prostheses pulled through the cartilage in a significantly greater proportion of cyclic tests (P = .015) and at lower mean (±SD) loads, (95.9 ± 23.4 N) during load-to-failure testing than Ethibond™ prostheses (155.2 ± 24.4 N; P = .0041). Lycra® had a significantly greater displacement with and without a cartilage interface when compared to Ethibond™ (P < .001, P < .002). The Lycra® isolated suture loops failed at significantly greater loads (233.0 ± 38.7 N) during load-to-failure testing than Ethibond™ loops (201.6 ± 47.4 N; P = .042). CONCLUSIONS: Lycra® prostheses embedded in laryngeal cartilage pulled through the cartilage at lower loads than Ethibond™ prostheses. Lycra® suture loops were stronger than Ethibond™ suture loops. Lycra® had greater displacement than Ethibond™ in all tests as suture loops or when embedded in cartilage. SN - 1532-950X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24899267/In_vitro_mechanical_testing_of_braided_polyurethane_elastic_fiber_and_braided_polyester_for_equine_laryngoplasty_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-950X.2014.12184.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -