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Lead exposure, B vitamins, and plasma homocysteine in men 55 years of age and older: the VA normative aging study.
Environ Health Perspect 2014; 122(10):1066-74EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Lead (Pb) exposure may influence the plasma concentration of homocysteine, a one-carbon metabolite associated with cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Little is known about the associations between Pb and homocysteine over time, or the potential influence of dietary factors.

OBJECTIVES

We examined the longitudinal association of recent and cumulative Pb exposure with homocysteine concentrations and the potential modifying effect of dietary nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism.

METHODS

In a subcohort of the Veterans Affairs (VA) Normative Aging Study (1,056 men with 2,301 total observations between 1993 and 2011), we used mixed-effects models to estimate differences in repeated measures of total plasma homocysteine across concentrations of Pb in blood and tibia bone, assessing recent and cumulative Pb exposure, respectively. We also assessed effect modification by dietary intake and plasma concentrations of folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12.

RESULTS

An interquartile range (IQR) increment in blood Pb (3 μg/dL) was associated with a 6.3% higher homocysteine concentration (95% CI: 4.8, 7.8%). An IQR increment in tibia bone Pb (14 μg/g) was associated with a 3.7% higher homocysteine (95% CI: 1.6, 5.6%), which was attenuated to 1.5% (95% CI: -0.5, 3.6%) after adjusting for blood Pb. For comparison, a 5-year increase in time from baseline was associated with a 5.7% increase in homocysteine (95% CI: 4.3, 7.1%). The association between blood Pb and homocysteine was significantly stronger among participants with estimated dietary intakes of vitamin B6 and folate below (vs. above) the study population medians, which were similar to the U.S. recommended dietary allowance intakes.

CONCLUSIONS

Pb exposure was positively associated with plasma homocysteine concentration. This association was stronger among men with below-median dietary intakes of vitamins B6 and folate. These findings suggest that increasing intake of folate and B6 might reduce Pb-associated increases in homocysteine, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and neurodegeneration.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24905780

Citation

Bakulski, Kelly M., et al. "Lead Exposure, B Vitamins, and Plasma Homocysteine in Men 55 Years of Age and Older: the VA Normative Aging Study." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 122, no. 10, 2014, pp. 1066-74.
Bakulski KM, Park SK, Weisskopf MG, et al. Lead exposure, B vitamins, and plasma homocysteine in men 55 years of age and older: the VA normative aging study. Environ Health Perspect. 2014;122(10):1066-74.
Bakulski, K. M., Park, S. K., Weisskopf, M. G., Tucker, K. L., Sparrow, D., Spiro, A., ... Weuve, J. (2014). Lead exposure, B vitamins, and plasma homocysteine in men 55 years of age and older: the VA normative aging study. Environmental Health Perspectives, 122(10), pp. 1066-74. doi:10.1289/ehp.1306931.
Bakulski KM, et al. Lead Exposure, B Vitamins, and Plasma Homocysteine in Men 55 Years of Age and Older: the VA Normative Aging Study. Environ Health Perspect. 2014;122(10):1066-74. PubMed PMID: 24905780.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lead exposure, B vitamins, and plasma homocysteine in men 55 years of age and older: the VA normative aging study. AU - Bakulski,Kelly M, AU - Park,Sung Kyun, AU - Weisskopf,Marc G, AU - Tucker,Katherine L, AU - Sparrow,David, AU - Spiro,Avron,3rd AU - Vokonas,Pantel S, AU - Nie,Linda Huiling, AU - Hu,Howard, AU - Weuve,Jennifer, Y1 - 2014/06/06/ PY - 2013/04/10/received PY - 2014/06/04/accepted PY - 2014/6/7/entrez PY - 2014/6/7/pubmed PY - 2015/7/15/medline SP - 1066 EP - 74 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ. Health Perspect. VL - 122 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Lead (Pb) exposure may influence the plasma concentration of homocysteine, a one-carbon metabolite associated with cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Little is known about the associations between Pb and homocysteine over time, or the potential influence of dietary factors. OBJECTIVES: We examined the longitudinal association of recent and cumulative Pb exposure with homocysteine concentrations and the potential modifying effect of dietary nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism. METHODS: In a subcohort of the Veterans Affairs (VA) Normative Aging Study (1,056 men with 2,301 total observations between 1993 and 2011), we used mixed-effects models to estimate differences in repeated measures of total plasma homocysteine across concentrations of Pb in blood and tibia bone, assessing recent and cumulative Pb exposure, respectively. We also assessed effect modification by dietary intake and plasma concentrations of folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. RESULTS: An interquartile range (IQR) increment in blood Pb (3 μg/dL) was associated with a 6.3% higher homocysteine concentration (95% CI: 4.8, 7.8%). An IQR increment in tibia bone Pb (14 μg/g) was associated with a 3.7% higher homocysteine (95% CI: 1.6, 5.6%), which was attenuated to 1.5% (95% CI: -0.5, 3.6%) after adjusting for blood Pb. For comparison, a 5-year increase in time from baseline was associated with a 5.7% increase in homocysteine (95% CI: 4.3, 7.1%). The association between blood Pb and homocysteine was significantly stronger among participants with estimated dietary intakes of vitamin B6 and folate below (vs. above) the study population medians, which were similar to the U.S. recommended dietary allowance intakes. CONCLUSIONS: Pb exposure was positively associated with plasma homocysteine concentration. This association was stronger among men with below-median dietary intakes of vitamins B6 and folate. These findings suggest that increasing intake of folate and B6 might reduce Pb-associated increases in homocysteine, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and neurodegeneration. SN - 1552-9924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24905780/Lead_exposure_B_vitamins_and_plasma_homocysteine_in_men_55_years_of_age_and_older:_the_VA_normative_aging_study_ L2 - https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/full/10.1289/ehp.1306931?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -