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A prospective analysis of airborne metal exposures and risk of Parkinson disease in the nurses' health study cohort.
Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Sep; 122(9):933-8.EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Exposure to metals has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD).

OBJECTIVES

We sought to examine in a large prospective study of female nurses whether exposure to airborne metals was associated with risk of PD.

METHODS

We linked the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s Air Toxics tract-level data with the Nurses' Health Study, a prospective cohort of female nurses. Over the course of 18 years of follow-up from 1990 through 2008, we identified 425 incident cases of PD. We examined the association of risk of PD with the following metals that were part of the first U.S. EPA collections in 1990, 1996, and 1999: arsenic, antimony, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and nickel. To estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs, we used the Cox proportional hazards model, adjusting for age, smoking, and population density.

RESULTS

In adjusted models, the HR for the highest compared with the lowest quartile of each metal ranged from 0.78 (95% CI: 0.59, 1.04) for chromium to 1.33 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.79) for mercury.

CONCLUSIONS

Overall, we found limited evidence for the association between adulthood ambient exposure to metals and risk of PD. The results for mercury need to be confirmed in future studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24905870

Citation

Palacios, Natalia, et al. "A Prospective Analysis of Airborne Metal Exposures and Risk of Parkinson Disease in the Nurses' Health Study Cohort." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 122, no. 9, 2014, pp. 933-8.
Palacios N, Fitzgerald K, Roberts AL, et al. A prospective analysis of airborne metal exposures and risk of Parkinson disease in the nurses' health study cohort. Environ Health Perspect. 2014;122(9):933-8.
Palacios, N., Fitzgerald, K., Roberts, A. L., Hart, J. E., Weisskopf, M. G., Schwarzschild, M. A., Ascherio, A., & Laden, F. (2014). A prospective analysis of airborne metal exposures and risk of Parkinson disease in the nurses' health study cohort. Environmental Health Perspectives, 122(9), 933-8. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307218
Palacios N, et al. A Prospective Analysis of Airborne Metal Exposures and Risk of Parkinson Disease in the Nurses' Health Study Cohort. Environ Health Perspect. 2014;122(9):933-8. PubMed PMID: 24905870.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective analysis of airborne metal exposures and risk of Parkinson disease in the nurses' health study cohort. AU - Palacios,Natalia, AU - Fitzgerald,Kathryn, AU - Roberts,Andrea L, AU - Hart,Jaime E, AU - Weisskopf,Marc G, AU - Schwarzschild,Michael A, AU - Ascherio,Alberto, AU - Laden,Francine, Y1 - 2014/06/06/ PY - 2013/06/13/received PY - 2014/06/03/accepted PY - 2014/6/7/entrez PY - 2014/6/7/pubmed PY - 2016/4/26/medline SP - 933 EP - 8 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ Health Perspect VL - 122 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Exposure to metals has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). OBJECTIVES: We sought to examine in a large prospective study of female nurses whether exposure to airborne metals was associated with risk of PD. METHODS: We linked the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s Air Toxics tract-level data with the Nurses' Health Study, a prospective cohort of female nurses. Over the course of 18 years of follow-up from 1990 through 2008, we identified 425 incident cases of PD. We examined the association of risk of PD with the following metals that were part of the first U.S. EPA collections in 1990, 1996, and 1999: arsenic, antimony, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and nickel. To estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs, we used the Cox proportional hazards model, adjusting for age, smoking, and population density. RESULTS: In adjusted models, the HR for the highest compared with the lowest quartile of each metal ranged from 0.78 (95% CI: 0.59, 1.04) for chromium to 1.33 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.79) for mercury. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found limited evidence for the association between adulthood ambient exposure to metals and risk of PD. The results for mercury need to be confirmed in future studies. SN - 1552-9924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24905870/A_prospective_analysis_of_airborne_metal_exposures_and_risk_of_Parkinson_disease_in_the_nurses'_health_study_cohort_ L2 - https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/ehp.1307218?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -