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Nonmaternal care hours and temperament predict infants' proximity-seeking behavior and attachment subgroups.
Infant Behav Dev. 2014 Aug; 37(3):352-65.IB

Abstract

Using the NICHD Early Childcare dataset (N=1281), this study examined whether infant temperament and the amount of time infants spend in nonmaternal care independently predict (1) the likelihood that they seek comfort from their mother when needed and (2) placement in a particular subgroup of infant-mother attachment patterns. Mothers reported the number of hours their infant spent in nonmaternal care each month and their infant's difficulty adapting to novel stimuli at 6 months. The degree to which 15-month-old infants seek comfort from their mother during reunion episodes in the Strange Situation was observed using two behavioral scales ("proximity seeking" and "contact maintaining"). Their average score forms the outcome variable of "proximity-seeking behavior." The other outcome variables were the subgroups of infant-mother attachment patterns: two subgroups for insecure babies (resistant and avoidant) and four subgroups for secure babies (B1, B2, B3, and B4). Easy adaptability to novel stimuli and long hours of nonmaternal care independently predicted a low level of proximity-seeking behavior. These predictors also increased the likelihood of an insecure infant being classified as avoidant (vs. resistant). A secure infant with these same predictors was most likely to be classified as B1, followed by B2, and then B3, with B4 being the least likely classification. Although previous studies using the NICHD dataset found that hours of nonmaternal care had no main effect on infants' attachment security (vs. insecurity), this study demonstrates that hours of nonmaternal care predict the subcategories of infant-mother attachment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Research on Children Youth and Family, Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Joštova 10, 602 00 Brno, Czech Republic. Electronic address: tomoumemura@mail.muni.cz.Department of Human Development and Family Sciences University of Texas at Austin 1 University Station, A2700 Austin, TX 78712. Electronic address: debj@austin.utexas.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24905902

Citation

Umemura, Tomo, and Deborah B. Jacobvitz. "Nonmaternal Care Hours and Temperament Predict Infants' Proximity-seeking Behavior and Attachment Subgroups." Infant Behavior & Development, vol. 37, no. 3, 2014, pp. 352-65.
Umemura T, Jacobvitz DB. Nonmaternal care hours and temperament predict infants' proximity-seeking behavior and attachment subgroups. Infant Behav Dev. 2014;37(3):352-65.
Umemura, T., & Jacobvitz, D. B. (2014). Nonmaternal care hours and temperament predict infants' proximity-seeking behavior and attachment subgroups. Infant Behavior & Development, 37(3), 352-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infbeh.2014.05.007
Umemura T, Jacobvitz DB. Nonmaternal Care Hours and Temperament Predict Infants' Proximity-seeking Behavior and Attachment Subgroups. Infant Behav Dev. 2014;37(3):352-65. PubMed PMID: 24905902.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nonmaternal care hours and temperament predict infants' proximity-seeking behavior and attachment subgroups. AU - Umemura,Tomo, AU - Jacobvitz,Deborah B, Y1 - 2014/06/04/ PY - 2013/10/17/received PY - 2014/02/04/revised PY - 2014/05/04/accepted PY - 2014/6/7/entrez PY - 2014/6/7/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline KW - Attachment KW - Nonmaternal care KW - Proximity-seeking behavior KW - Temperament KW - The Strange Situation SP - 352 EP - 65 JF - Infant behavior & development JO - Infant Behav Dev VL - 37 IS - 3 N2 - Using the NICHD Early Childcare dataset (N=1281), this study examined whether infant temperament and the amount of time infants spend in nonmaternal care independently predict (1) the likelihood that they seek comfort from their mother when needed and (2) placement in a particular subgroup of infant-mother attachment patterns. Mothers reported the number of hours their infant spent in nonmaternal care each month and their infant's difficulty adapting to novel stimuli at 6 months. The degree to which 15-month-old infants seek comfort from their mother during reunion episodes in the Strange Situation was observed using two behavioral scales ("proximity seeking" and "contact maintaining"). Their average score forms the outcome variable of "proximity-seeking behavior." The other outcome variables were the subgroups of infant-mother attachment patterns: two subgroups for insecure babies (resistant and avoidant) and four subgroups for secure babies (B1, B2, B3, and B4). Easy adaptability to novel stimuli and long hours of nonmaternal care independently predicted a low level of proximity-seeking behavior. These predictors also increased the likelihood of an insecure infant being classified as avoidant (vs. resistant). A secure infant with these same predictors was most likely to be classified as B1, followed by B2, and then B3, with B4 being the least likely classification. Although previous studies using the NICHD dataset found that hours of nonmaternal care had no main effect on infants' attachment security (vs. insecurity), this study demonstrates that hours of nonmaternal care predict the subcategories of infant-mother attachment. SN - 1934-8800 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24905902/Nonmaternal_care_hours_and_temperament_predict_infants'_proximity_seeking_behavior_and_attachment_subgroups_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0163-6383(14)00050-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -