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Prenatal exposure to manganese in South African coastal communities.
Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014 Aug; 16(8):1903-12.ES

Abstract

Exposure to environmental sources and altered physiological processes of manganese uptake during pregnancy and its possible effect on prenatal and postnatal development are of concern. This study investigates manganese blood levels at the time of delivery across four cohorts of pregnant women residing in coastal communities of South Africa and examines birth outcomes and environmental factors that could influence manganese levels in the study population. The geometric mean (GM) manganese blood levels (MnB) for all women at delivery was 15.2 μg L(-1). Collectively, rural women reported higher MnB concentrations (GM, 16.1 μg L(-1)) than urban women (GM, 13.5 μg L(-1), p < 0.001). Of the 302 cord blood samples drawn from the study participants (rural women only), GM MnB levels reported for three rural sites were 25.8 μg L(-1) (Rural 1), 33.4 μg L(-1) (Rural 2) and 43.0 μg L(-1) (Rural 3) and were twice as high as their respective maternal levels. However, no significant correlations were found between maternal and cord MnB levels across the 3 study areas. Factors associated with elevated maternal MnB levels, after adjusting for gestational age were: women living in a rural area (Rural 2) (p = 0.021); women drinking potable water from an outdoor/communal tap sourced from municipality (p = 0.021); drinking water from river/stream (p = 0.036); younger maternal age (p = 0.026); consuming leafy vegetables once a week (p = 0.034); and elevated maternal blood lead concentrations (PbB) (p = 0.002). The results indicate that MnB concentration in rural women during pregnancy is higher compared to urban women and increases with manganese intake from food and water.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Environment and Health Research Unit, Medical Research Council, PO BOX 87373, Houghton 2041, Johannesburg, South Africa. hrollin@mrc.ac.za.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24912024

Citation

Röllin, Halina B., et al. "Prenatal Exposure to Manganese in South African Coastal Communities." Environmental Science. Processes & Impacts, vol. 16, no. 8, 2014, pp. 1903-12.
Röllin HB, Kootbodien T, Theodorou P, et al. Prenatal exposure to manganese in South African coastal communities. Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014;16(8):1903-12.
Röllin, H. B., Kootbodien, T., Theodorou, P., & Odland, J. Ø. (2014). Prenatal exposure to manganese in South African coastal communities. Environmental Science. Processes & Impacts, 16(8), 1903-12. https://doi.org/10.1039/c4em00131a
Röllin HB, et al. Prenatal Exposure to Manganese in South African Coastal Communities. Environ Sci Process Impacts. 2014;16(8):1903-12. PubMed PMID: 24912024.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal exposure to manganese in South African coastal communities. AU - Röllin,Halina B, AU - Kootbodien,Tahira, AU - Theodorou,Penny, AU - Odland,Jon Ø, PY - 2014/6/10/entrez PY - 2014/6/10/pubmed PY - 2015/3/31/medline SP - 1903 EP - 12 JF - Environmental science. Processes & impacts JO - Environ Sci Process Impacts VL - 16 IS - 8 N2 - Exposure to environmental sources and altered physiological processes of manganese uptake during pregnancy and its possible effect on prenatal and postnatal development are of concern. This study investigates manganese blood levels at the time of delivery across four cohorts of pregnant women residing in coastal communities of South Africa and examines birth outcomes and environmental factors that could influence manganese levels in the study population. The geometric mean (GM) manganese blood levels (MnB) for all women at delivery was 15.2 μg L(-1). Collectively, rural women reported higher MnB concentrations (GM, 16.1 μg L(-1)) than urban women (GM, 13.5 μg L(-1), p < 0.001). Of the 302 cord blood samples drawn from the study participants (rural women only), GM MnB levels reported for three rural sites were 25.8 μg L(-1) (Rural 1), 33.4 μg L(-1) (Rural 2) and 43.0 μg L(-1) (Rural 3) and were twice as high as their respective maternal levels. However, no significant correlations were found between maternal and cord MnB levels across the 3 study areas. Factors associated with elevated maternal MnB levels, after adjusting for gestational age were: women living in a rural area (Rural 2) (p = 0.021); women drinking potable water from an outdoor/communal tap sourced from municipality (p = 0.021); drinking water from river/stream (p = 0.036); younger maternal age (p = 0.026); consuming leafy vegetables once a week (p = 0.034); and elevated maternal blood lead concentrations (PbB) (p = 0.002). The results indicate that MnB concentration in rural women during pregnancy is higher compared to urban women and increases with manganese intake from food and water. SN - 2050-7895 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24912024/Prenatal_exposure_to_manganese_in_South_African_coastal_communities_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/c4em00131a DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -