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Association of longitudinal changes in left ventricular structure and function with myocardial fibrosis: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis study.
Hypertension 2014; 64(3):508-15H

Abstract

The association of longitudinal changes in left ventricular (LV) structure and function with myocardial fibrosis is unclear. We relate temporal changes in body size-indexed LV mass (LVMi) and end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area, LV mass-to-volume ratio, and LV ejection fraction (LVEF) from cine cardiac magnetic resonance for 10 years, with replacement scar assessed from late gadolinium enhancement, and lower postcontrast T1 times reflecting greater diffuse myocardial fibrosis measured at the end of the follow-up period. All participants (n=1813) who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance twice as part of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 10 years apart were included. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors measured the association of 10-year changes in LV structure and function, with fibrosis measured at follow-up. The presence of LV scar at year 10 was cross-sectionally associated with higher LVMi (≈10 g/m(2)), higher mass-to-volume ratio (0.1-0.2 g/mL), but lower LVEF (≈4%) and longitudinally with 3% decrease in LVEF and 0.7% greater end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area in men for 10 years. Lower postcontrast T1 times at year 10 were associated cross-sectionally with lower LVMi (r=0.33), end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area (r=0.25), and LVEF (in men only: r=0.14) and longitudinally with a decrease in LVMi (r=0.20) and reduction in LVEF (in men only: r=0.15). Sustained hypertension for 10 years was associated with increased LVMi and higher diffuse and replacement fibrosis at follow-up. During a 10-year period, increased concentric hypertrophy in women and LV dilatation in men were associated with replacement fibrosis, whereas decreasing LVMi was associated with diffuse fibrosis. Hypertension-induced remodeling was related to enhanced replacement and diffuse fibrosis, as well as hypertrophy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Department of Radiology (B.A.V.) and Department of Cardiology (G.J.V., S.D., N.M., J.A.C.L.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY (S.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (K.L.); Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (G.B.); and Radiology and Imaging Sciences (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.), and Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (C.W.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.From the Department of Radiology (B.A.V.) and Department of Cardiology (G.J.V., S.D., N.M., J.A.C.L.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY (S.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (K.L.); Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (G.B.); and Radiology and Imaging Sciences (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.), and Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (C.W.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.From the Department of Radiology (B.A.V.) and Department of Cardiology (G.J.V., S.D., N.M., J.A.C.L.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY (S.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (K.L.); Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (G.B.); and Radiology and Imaging Sciences (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.), and Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (C.W.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.From the Department of Radiology (B.A.V.) and Department of Cardiology (G.J.V., S.D., N.M., J.A.C.L.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY (S.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (K.L.); Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (G.B.); and Radiology and Imaging Sciences (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.), and Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (C.W.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.From the Department of Radiology (B.A.V.) and Department of Cardiology (G.J.V., S.D., N.M., J.A.C.L.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY (S.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (K.L.); Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (G.B.); and Radiology and Imaging Sciences (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.), and Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (C.W.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.From the Department of Radiology (B.A.V.) and Department of Cardiology (G.J.V., S.D., N.M., J.A.C.L.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY (S.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (K.L.); Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (G.B.); and Radiology and Imaging Sciences (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.), and Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (C.W.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.From the Department of Radiology (B.A.V.) and Department of Cardiology (G.J.V., S.D., N.M., J.A.C.L.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY (S.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (K.L.); Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (G.B.); and Radiology and Imaging Sciences (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.), and Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (C.W.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.From the Department of Radiology (B.A.V.) and Department of Cardiology (G.J.V., S.D., N.M., J.A.C.L.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY (S.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (K.L.); Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (G.B.); and Radiology and Imaging Sciences (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.), and Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (C.W.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.From the Department of Radiology (B.A.V.) and Department of Cardiology (G.J.V., S.D., N.M., J.A.C.L.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY (S.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (K.L.); Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (G.B.); and Radiology and Imaging Sciences (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.), and Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (C.W.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.From the Department of Radiology (B.A.V.) and Department of Cardiology (G.J.V., S.D., N.M., J.A.C.L.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY (S.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (K.L.); Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (G.B.); and Radiology and Imaging Sciences (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.), and Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (C.W.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.From the Department of Radiology (B.A.V.) and Department of Cardiology (G.J.V., S.D., N.M., J.A.C.L.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY (S.S.); Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL (K.L.); Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (G.B.); and Radiology and Imaging Sciences (C.-Y.L., D.A.B.), and Office of Biostatistics Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (C.W.), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. jlima@jhmi.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24914198

Citation

Ambale Venkatesh, Bharath, et al. "Association of Longitudinal Changes in Left Ventricular Structure and Function With Myocardial Fibrosis: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Study." Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979), vol. 64, no. 3, 2014, pp. 508-15.
Ambale Venkatesh B, Volpe GJ, Donekal S, et al. Association of longitudinal changes in left ventricular structure and function with myocardial fibrosis: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis study. Hypertension. 2014;64(3):508-15.
Ambale Venkatesh, B., Volpe, G. J., Donekal, S., Mewton, N., Liu, C. Y., Shea, S., ... Lima, J. A. (2014). Association of longitudinal changes in left ventricular structure and function with myocardial fibrosis: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis study. Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979), 64(3), pp. 508-15. doi:10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.03697.
Ambale Venkatesh B, et al. Association of Longitudinal Changes in Left Ventricular Structure and Function With Myocardial Fibrosis: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Study. Hypertension. 2014;64(3):508-15. PubMed PMID: 24914198.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of longitudinal changes in left ventricular structure and function with myocardial fibrosis: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis study. AU - Ambale Venkatesh,Bharath, AU - Volpe,Gustavo J, AU - Donekal,Sirisha, AU - Mewton,Nathan, AU - Liu,Chia-Ying, AU - Shea,Steven, AU - Liu,Kiang, AU - Burke,Gregory, AU - Wu,Colin, AU - Bluemke,David A, AU - Lima,João A C, Y1 - 2014/06/09/ PY - 2014/6/11/entrez PY - 2014/6/11/pubmed PY - 2014/10/17/medline KW - fibrosis KW - hypertension KW - hypertrophy KW - magnetic resonance imaging KW - ventricular function, left KW - ventricular remodeling SP - 508 EP - 15 JF - Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979) JO - Hypertension VL - 64 IS - 3 N2 - The association of longitudinal changes in left ventricular (LV) structure and function with myocardial fibrosis is unclear. We relate temporal changes in body size-indexed LV mass (LVMi) and end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area, LV mass-to-volume ratio, and LV ejection fraction (LVEF) from cine cardiac magnetic resonance for 10 years, with replacement scar assessed from late gadolinium enhancement, and lower postcontrast T1 times reflecting greater diffuse myocardial fibrosis measured at the end of the follow-up period. All participants (n=1813) who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance twice as part of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis 10 years apart were included. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors measured the association of 10-year changes in LV structure and function, with fibrosis measured at follow-up. The presence of LV scar at year 10 was cross-sectionally associated with higher LVMi (≈10 g/m(2)), higher mass-to-volume ratio (0.1-0.2 g/mL), but lower LVEF (≈4%) and longitudinally with 3% decrease in LVEF and 0.7% greater end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area in men for 10 years. Lower postcontrast T1 times at year 10 were associated cross-sectionally with lower LVMi (r=0.33), end-diastolic volume indexed to body surface area (r=0.25), and LVEF (in men only: r=0.14) and longitudinally with a decrease in LVMi (r=0.20) and reduction in LVEF (in men only: r=0.15). Sustained hypertension for 10 years was associated with increased LVMi and higher diffuse and replacement fibrosis at follow-up. During a 10-year period, increased concentric hypertrophy in women and LV dilatation in men were associated with replacement fibrosis, whereas decreasing LVMi was associated with diffuse fibrosis. Hypertension-induced remodeling was related to enhanced replacement and diffuse fibrosis, as well as hypertrophy. SN - 1524-4563 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24914198/Association_of_longitudinal_changes_in_left_ventricular_structure_and_function_with_myocardial_fibrosis:_the_Multi_Ethnic_Study_of_Atherosclerosis_study_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.03697?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -