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Quality-related enzymes in plant-based products: effects of novel food-processing technologies part 3: ultrasonic processing.
Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2015; 55(2):147-58CR

Abstract

High-power ultrasound is a versatile technology which can potentially be used in many food processing applications including food preservation. This is part 2 of a series of review articles dealing with the effectiveness of nonthermal food processing technologies in food preservation focusing on their effect on enzymes. Typically, ultrasound treatment alone does not efficiently cause microbial or enzyme inactivation sufficient for food preservation. However, combined with mild heat with or without elevated pressure (P ≤ 500 kPa), ultrasound can effectively inactivate enzymes and microorganisms. Synergistic effects between ultrasound and mild heat have been reported for the inactivation of both enzymes and microorganisms. The application of ultrasound has been shown to enhance the rate of inactivation of quality degrading enzymes including pectin methylesterase (PME), polygalacturonase (PG), peroxidase (POD), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and lipoxygenase (LOX) at mild temperature by up to 400 times. Moreover, ultrasound enables the inactivation of relatively heat-resistant enzymes such as tomato PG1 and thermostable orange PME at mild temperature conditions. The extent to which ultrasound enhances the inactivation rate depends on the type of enzyme, the medium in which the enzyme is suspended, and the processing condition including frequency, ultrasonic intensity, temperature, and pressure. The physical and chemical effects of cavitation are considered to be responsible for the ultrasound-induced inactivation of enzymes, although the dominant mechanism depends on the structure of the enzyme.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a CSIRO Animal, Food, and Health Sciences , Werribee , Victoria , Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24915308

Citation

Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw, et al. "Quality-related Enzymes in Plant-based Products: Effects of Novel Food-processing Technologies Part 3: Ultrasonic Processing." Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, vol. 55, no. 2, 2015, pp. 147-58.
Terefe NS, Buckow R, Versteeg C. Quality-related enzymes in plant-based products: effects of novel food-processing technologies part 3: ultrasonic processing. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2015;55(2):147-58.
Terefe, N. S., Buckow, R., & Versteeg, C. (2015). Quality-related enzymes in plant-based products: effects of novel food-processing technologies part 3: ultrasonic processing. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 55(2), pp. 147-58. doi:10.1080/10408398.2011.586134.
Terefe NS, Buckow R, Versteeg C. Quality-related Enzymes in Plant-based Products: Effects of Novel Food-processing Technologies Part 3: Ultrasonic Processing. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2015;55(2):147-58. PubMed PMID: 24915308.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Quality-related enzymes in plant-based products: effects of novel food-processing technologies part 3: ultrasonic processing. AU - Terefe,Netsanet Shiferaw, AU - Buckow,Roman, AU - Versteeg,Cornelis, PY - 2014/6/11/entrez PY - 2012/10/3/pubmed PY - 2015/12/23/medline KW - Ultrasonic processing KW - enzyme inactivation KW - enzyme inactivation kinetics KW - lipoxygenase KW - pectin methylesterase KW - peroxidase KW - polygalacturonase KW - polyphenol oxidase SP - 147 EP - 58 JF - Critical reviews in food science and nutrition JO - Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr VL - 55 IS - 2 N2 - High-power ultrasound is a versatile technology which can potentially be used in many food processing applications including food preservation. This is part 2 of a series of review articles dealing with the effectiveness of nonthermal food processing technologies in food preservation focusing on their effect on enzymes. Typically, ultrasound treatment alone does not efficiently cause microbial or enzyme inactivation sufficient for food preservation. However, combined with mild heat with or without elevated pressure (P ≤ 500 kPa), ultrasound can effectively inactivate enzymes and microorganisms. Synergistic effects between ultrasound and mild heat have been reported for the inactivation of both enzymes and microorganisms. The application of ultrasound has been shown to enhance the rate of inactivation of quality degrading enzymes including pectin methylesterase (PME), polygalacturonase (PG), peroxidase (POD), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and lipoxygenase (LOX) at mild temperature by up to 400 times. Moreover, ultrasound enables the inactivation of relatively heat-resistant enzymes such as tomato PG1 and thermostable orange PME at mild temperature conditions. The extent to which ultrasound enhances the inactivation rate depends on the type of enzyme, the medium in which the enzyme is suspended, and the processing condition including frequency, ultrasonic intensity, temperature, and pressure. The physical and chemical effects of cavitation are considered to be responsible for the ultrasound-induced inactivation of enzymes, although the dominant mechanism depends on the structure of the enzyme. SN - 1549-7852 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24915308/Quality_related_enzymes_in_plant_based_products:_effects_of_novel_food_processing_technologies_part_3:_ultrasonic_processing_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10408398.2011.586134 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -