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Swedish children with celiac disease comply well with a gluten-free diet, and most include oats without reporting any adverse effects: a long-term follow-up study.
Nutr Res 2014; 34(5):436-41NR

Abstract

The only known treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet (GFD), which initially meant abstention from wheat, rye, barley, and oats. Recently, oats free from contamination with wheat have been accepted in the GFD. Yet, reports indicate that all celiac disease patients may not tolerate oats. We hypothesized that celiac children comply well with a GFD and that most have included oats in their diet. A food questionnaire was used to check our patients; 316 questionnaires were returned. Mean time on the GFD was 6.9 years, and 96.8% of the children reported that they were trying to keep a strict GFD. However, accidental transgressions occurred in 263 children (83.2%). In 2 of 3 cases, mistakes took place when the patients were not at home. Symptoms after incidental gluten intake were experienced by 162 (61.6%) patients, mostly (87.5%) from the gastrointestinal tract. Small amounts of gluten (<4 g) caused symptoms in 38% of the cases, and 68% reported symptoms during the first 3 hours after gluten consumption. Oats were included in the diet of 89.4% of the children for a mean of 3.4 years. Most (81.9%) ate purified oats, and 45.3% consumed oats less than once a week. Among those who did not consume oats, only 5.9% refrained because of symptoms. General compliance with the GFD was good. Only the duration of the GFD appeared to influence adherence to the diet. Most patients did not report adverse effects after long-term consumption of oats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. Electronic address: dimta624@student.liu.se.Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, Norrköping Hospital, County Council of Östergötland, Norrköping, Sweden.Pediatric Clinic, Västervik Hospital, Västervik, Sweden.Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24916557

Citation

Tapsas, Dimitrios, et al. "Swedish Children With Celiac Disease Comply Well With a Gluten-free Diet, and Most Include Oats Without Reporting Any Adverse Effects: a Long-term Follow-up Study." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 34, no. 5, 2014, pp. 436-41.
Tapsas D, Fälth-Magnusson K, Högberg L, et al. Swedish children with celiac disease comply well with a gluten-free diet, and most include oats without reporting any adverse effects: a long-term follow-up study. Nutr Res. 2014;34(5):436-41.
Tapsas, D., Fälth-Magnusson, K., Högberg, L., Hammersjö, J. Å., & Hollén, E. (2014). Swedish children with celiac disease comply well with a gluten-free diet, and most include oats without reporting any adverse effects: a long-term follow-up study. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 34(5), pp. 436-41. doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2014.04.006.
Tapsas D, et al. Swedish Children With Celiac Disease Comply Well With a Gluten-free Diet, and Most Include Oats Without Reporting Any Adverse Effects: a Long-term Follow-up Study. Nutr Res. 2014;34(5):436-41. PubMed PMID: 24916557.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Swedish children with celiac disease comply well with a gluten-free diet, and most include oats without reporting any adverse effects: a long-term follow-up study. AU - Tapsas,Dimitrios, AU - Fälth-Magnusson,Karin, AU - Högberg,Lotta, AU - Hammersjö,Jan-Åke, AU - Hollén,Elisabet, Y1 - 2014/04/18/ PY - 2013/12/30/received PY - 2014/03/17/revised PY - 2014/04/09/accepted PY - 2014/6/12/entrez PY - 2014/6/12/pubmed PY - 2015/1/15/medline KW - Celiac disease KW - Children KW - Food questionnaire KW - GFD compliance KW - Oats SP - 436 EP - 41 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 34 IS - 5 N2 - The only known treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet (GFD), which initially meant abstention from wheat, rye, barley, and oats. Recently, oats free from contamination with wheat have been accepted in the GFD. Yet, reports indicate that all celiac disease patients may not tolerate oats. We hypothesized that celiac children comply well with a GFD and that most have included oats in their diet. A food questionnaire was used to check our patients; 316 questionnaires were returned. Mean time on the GFD was 6.9 years, and 96.8% of the children reported that they were trying to keep a strict GFD. However, accidental transgressions occurred in 263 children (83.2%). In 2 of 3 cases, mistakes took place when the patients were not at home. Symptoms after incidental gluten intake were experienced by 162 (61.6%) patients, mostly (87.5%) from the gastrointestinal tract. Small amounts of gluten (<4 g) caused symptoms in 38% of the cases, and 68% reported symptoms during the first 3 hours after gluten consumption. Oats were included in the diet of 89.4% of the children for a mean of 3.4 years. Most (81.9%) ate purified oats, and 45.3% consumed oats less than once a week. Among those who did not consume oats, only 5.9% refrained because of symptoms. General compliance with the GFD was good. Only the duration of the GFD appeared to influence adherence to the diet. Most patients did not report adverse effects after long-term consumption of oats. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24916557/Swedish_children_with_celiac_disease_comply_well_with_a_gluten_free_diet_and_most_include_oats_without_reporting_any_adverse_effects:_a_long_term_follow_up_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(14)00061-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -