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Dietary protein sources in early adulthood and breast cancer incidence: prospective cohort study.
BMJ. 2014 Jun 10; 348:g3437.BMJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the association between dietary protein sources in early adulthood and risk of breast cancer.

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING

Health professionals in the United States.

PARTICIPANTS

88,803 premenopausal women from the Nurses' Health Study II who completed a questionnaire on diet in 1991.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Incident cases of invasive breast carcinoma, identified through self report and confirmed by pathology report.

RESULTS

We documented 2830 cases of breast cancer during 20 years of follow-up. Higher intake of total red meat was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer overall (relative risk 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.40; P(trend) = 0.01, for highest fifth v lowest fifth of intake). However, higher intakes of poultry, fish, eggs, legumes, and nuts were not related to breast cancer overall. When the association was evaluated by menopausal status, higher intake of poultry was associated with a lower risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women (0.73, 0.58 to 0.91; P(trend) =0.02, for highest fifth v lowest fifth of intake) but not in premenopausal women (0.93, 0.78 to 1.11; P(trend) = 0.60, for highest fifth v lowest fifth of intake). In estimating the effects of exchanging different protein sources, substituting one serving/day of legumes for one serving/day of red meat was associated with a 15% lower risk of breast cancer among all women (0.85, 0.73 to 0.98) and a 19% lower risk among premenopausal women (0.81, 0.66 to 0.99). Also, substituting one serving/day of poultry for one serving/day of red meat was associated with a 17% lower risk of breast cancer overall (0.83, 0.72 to 0.96) and a 24% lower risk of postmenopausal breast cancer (0.76, 0.59 to 0.99). Furthermore, substituting one serving/day of combined legumes, nuts, poultry, and fish for one serving/day of red meat was associated with a 14% lower risk of breast cancer overall (0.86, 0.78 to 0.94) and premenopausal breast cancer (0.86, 0.76 to 0.98).

CONCLUSION

Higher red meat intake in early adulthood may be a risk factor for breast cancer, and replacing red meat with a combination of legumes, poultry, nuts and fish may reduce the risk of breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston 02115, MA, USA Department of Community Nutrition, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran mfarvid@hsph.harvard.edu.Department of Dermatology, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston 02115, MA, USA Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24916719

Citation

Farvid, Maryam S., et al. "Dietary Protein Sources in Early Adulthood and Breast Cancer Incidence: Prospective Cohort Study." BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), vol. 348, 2014, pp. g3437.
Farvid MS, Cho E, Chen WY, et al. Dietary protein sources in early adulthood and breast cancer incidence: prospective cohort study. BMJ. 2014;348:g3437.
Farvid, M. S., Cho, E., Chen, W. Y., Eliassen, A. H., & Willett, W. C. (2014). Dietary protein sources in early adulthood and breast cancer incidence: prospective cohort study. BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), 348, g3437. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g3437
Farvid MS, et al. Dietary Protein Sources in Early Adulthood and Breast Cancer Incidence: Prospective Cohort Study. BMJ. 2014 Jun 10;348:g3437. PubMed PMID: 24916719.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary protein sources in early adulthood and breast cancer incidence: prospective cohort study. AU - Farvid,Maryam S, AU - Cho,Eunyoung, AU - Chen,Wendy Y, AU - Eliassen,A Heather, AU - Willett,Walter C, Y1 - 2014/06/10/ PY - 2014/6/12/entrez PY - 2014/6/12/pubmed PY - 2014/7/30/medline SP - g3437 EP - g3437 JF - BMJ (Clinical research ed.) JO - BMJ VL - 348 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between dietary protein sources in early adulthood and risk of breast cancer. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Health professionals in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: 88,803 premenopausal women from the Nurses' Health Study II who completed a questionnaire on diet in 1991. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Incident cases of invasive breast carcinoma, identified through self report and confirmed by pathology report. RESULTS: We documented 2830 cases of breast cancer during 20 years of follow-up. Higher intake of total red meat was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer overall (relative risk 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.40; P(trend) = 0.01, for highest fifth v lowest fifth of intake). However, higher intakes of poultry, fish, eggs, legumes, and nuts were not related to breast cancer overall. When the association was evaluated by menopausal status, higher intake of poultry was associated with a lower risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women (0.73, 0.58 to 0.91; P(trend) =0.02, for highest fifth v lowest fifth of intake) but not in premenopausal women (0.93, 0.78 to 1.11; P(trend) = 0.60, for highest fifth v lowest fifth of intake). In estimating the effects of exchanging different protein sources, substituting one serving/day of legumes for one serving/day of red meat was associated with a 15% lower risk of breast cancer among all women (0.85, 0.73 to 0.98) and a 19% lower risk among premenopausal women (0.81, 0.66 to 0.99). Also, substituting one serving/day of poultry for one serving/day of red meat was associated with a 17% lower risk of breast cancer overall (0.83, 0.72 to 0.96) and a 24% lower risk of postmenopausal breast cancer (0.76, 0.59 to 0.99). Furthermore, substituting one serving/day of combined legumes, nuts, poultry, and fish for one serving/day of red meat was associated with a 14% lower risk of breast cancer overall (0.86, 0.78 to 0.94) and premenopausal breast cancer (0.86, 0.76 to 0.98). CONCLUSION: Higher red meat intake in early adulthood may be a risk factor for breast cancer, and replacing red meat with a combination of legumes, poultry, nuts and fish may reduce the risk of breast cancer. SN - 1756-1833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24916719/Dietary_protein_sources_in_early_adulthood_and_breast_cancer_incidence:_prospective_cohort_study_ L2 - http://www.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=24916719 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -